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January 2019

Outlander North Carolina

ONC Administrators’ Choice Awards – The Best & Worst of Episode 411, If Not For Hope

January 18, 2019

This week the admins for Outlander North Carolina will be focusing on Episode 411, If Not For Hope. Our voting contributors this week are Susan Jackson, Stephanie Bryant, Nancy Roach, Tara Heller, Mitzie Munroe, Blair Beard, Harmony Tersanschi, and me, Beth Pittman. Now for the envelope please…

Blair: When Fergus declined Murtagh’s request for him to fight with him, my heart warmed. Fergus turned him down, so that he could stay with Marsali and Germain.

Susan:  At first, I answered this with “Claire and Jamie making up,” but when I remembered the scene w/ Fergus and Marsali, and seeing some of her mother in her, but the good part (there has to be some good in Laoghaire, right?), I think her encouragement to her husband is my favorite.  I wish they’d show more of Fersali.

Stephanie: The River Run scenes with Lord John Grey!! (Except for one) Love his interactions with Bree. Of course, when he enters the dining room along with his own musical accompaniment!

Nancy: When LJG enters the room to the disappointed glares of the other single men at the dinner party.

Mitzie: It would have to be when Lord John Grey made his grand entrance at the dinner party. Just seeing Forbes and Lt. Wolfe’s faces just lose all hope at that moment was just too funny.

Tara: LJ entering the dinner party and knocking the wind out of the eligible bachelors sails.

Beth:  The make up scene with Jamie & Claire. Sam is killing it this year and that scene was so beautiful and tender. Goes to show you don’t necessarily have to have nudity to have a perfect love scene.

Harmony: LJG’s grand entrance and the way everyone stopped what they were doing & eyed him down.

Blair: Jamie’s half comment/half question,  “I would be seen as a fearsome brute”, is memorable. His tone leaves room for Claire to comment otherwise,  but she shrugs and says, “that would be one side of the story.”

Susan:  I don’t recall the exact line, but I loved hearing Jamie compare his longing for Claire during the “lost” years to Bree’s separation from Roger.

Stephanie:  “LJG: “Thank you for waiting for me my dear” “Have you told them the good news?” You could hear a pin drop!

Nancy:  Marsali: “ I’ll have a whole man or none at all.”

Mitzie: Ian: “Do you think anyone will miss him”?  Jamie’s reply: “One thing’s for sure, he was someone’s child”. Ugg, that had me tearing up.

Beth: When Claire said “I’m sorry” to Jamie – twice. She had completely failed to take any responsibility for her role in the Roger fiasco so I’m so glad she apologized.

Harmony: LJG: “It’s only new because there is hope, and hope is at the very heart of love.”

Blair: Sophie Skelton captivates the episode. Brianna’s in an unenviable position of being an unwed mother to be, during a different time. Yet, she is a quick thinker and deflects attention from herself,  during Jocasta’s dinner party, to the silly suitors.

Susan: The actor who plays Lt. Wolfe was a hoot–his facial expressions should win an Emmy.

Stephanie:  David Berry, he can stand still and still be a great actor!

Nancy: I would like to give a shout out to all the supporting actors. They were all strong. That’s what makes a scene worth watching. (Loved seeing a Hobbit vie for Bree’s hand in marriage. Lol!) Lauren Lyle is really holding her own as Marsali.

Mitzie: I just absolutely loved watching Lee Boardman as Lt. Wolfe this episode. I had so much fun watching all of his movements like puffing his chest out and giving Forbes some interesting steely eyed looks across the way.

Tara: David Berry- I enjoyed seeing his acting in scenes without Sam. It was a whole other side of him. I appreciate him a lot more.

Beth: David Berry. Oh, how many different layers of Lord John Grey did he revealed to us in this episode??? Loved it.

Harmony: David Berry as per usual stole the show for me this episode. He is a class act & plays LJG phenomenally in my opinion.

Blair: I was feeling annoyed with Lord John Grey, but then he takes a turn and strides into Jocasta’s parlor to “save the day”! If the Lone Ranger’s,  “William Tell Overture”, had piped in, I wouldn’t have been surprised. Bree was happy, Jocasta was surprised, and Gerald Forbes was stopped in his tracks.

Susan:  Murtagh capturing Bonnet so easily–Bonnet is surely a wanted man, and him hanging out in plain sight, well, not a good move for him.

Stephanie: The opening scene with Roger in the shower. I kept thinking WHY?? Not sure except as a teaser for book readers? Was it a dream?? Still pondering it!

Nancy: Roger taking a shower. For a second I thought, “Don’t tell me the writers decided to stray that far from the books! Please have mercy! We’ve had enough deviations from Diana’s works!”

Mitzie: The opening scene with Roger in the shower. My brain went instantly into scramble mode to try and understand what I am watching and just when I thought I had an idea as to why the writers are having Roger back in the future he is instantly pulled back into the past. WHEW, that had me spinning for a moment.

Tara: Pantry scene- just not in character for LJ. He has more discretion.

Beth: Bree catching LJG in the wide-open pantry. I was not expecting it to play out that way at all.

Harmony: The scene with Phaedra & Bree. I loved Phaedra’s accent & the exchange between the two about Bree’s reasons for wanting to draw her. Very sweet & surprising moment.

Blair: I liked that there was time spent in different locations with the characters; River Run, the trail northward and Wilmington. The story development and scenery at River Run was my favorite.

Susan:  The theme of hope throughout the episode–we all need that reminder, no matter how bad things may be.

Stephanie: Seeing Bree as a young mother having a baby in the 1760’s. The transformation as she talks with LJG and Aunt Jocasta. She begins to understand the differences from her time to the present.

Nancy: The interaction between LJG and Bree. I love LJG and look forward to his scenes. However, I agree with others about the indiscreet sex scene being out of character for this very proper British Lord.

Mitzie: Seeing Bree adapting to her new norm at River Run. I enjoyed seeing her passing the time by drawing; seeing her dressed in her new dresses courtesy of her Auntie and watching her handle some tough conversations with Jocasta and LJG.

Tara: Seeing Bree at River Run and interacting with LJ.

Beth: This episode was about relationships. Bree & Jocasta, Bree & LJG, Marsali & Fergus, Murtagh & Fergus, Murtagh & Marsali and Jamie & Claire. Relationships are what make the Outlander books so wonderful and this episode was special because of that.

Harmony: Finally getting to see LJG and Bree together. Their talk on the porch was specifically what I enjoyed the most out of the episode.

Blair: What I did not care for was Aunt Jocasta’s eagerness to marry Bree off. Auntie was a product of her time, but thankfully, Brianna and Lord John made Lemonade out of the lemon suitors.

Susan:  LJG completely losing his mind and having sex with another man in someone else’s house, with the door wide open, and the “lights” on.  Completely out of character for LJG. I can imagine Diana Gabaldon shook her head when she saw that scene written in there. But that’s just the number one issue I had with this episode.  Oh, well.

Stephanie:  LJG out of character having sex in the hallway, no way that would happen!!

Nancy: Things I have problems with: How can Bree stay that clean when drawing with charcoal? Why weren’t Fergus and Marsali invited to the dinner party? Bree’s elbows on the table as she leans in to talk to LJG at a formal dinner party is out of character for her upbringing. I hear my mother saying “Mabel, Mabel, strong and able, keep your elbows off the table. This is not a horses table. This is a dining room table.” Lord John having indiscreet sex in an open area is out of character. Claire’s hairstyle. I picture book Claire with, long, loose uncovered hair or maybe in a long braid. When she wears that scarf, is this supposed to be her protest against slavery as black females were required to wear a turbin?

Mitzie: Seeing LJG in the pantry with the Judge. It was not in his character to do something like that and I can’t seem to figure out why the writers felt that scene needed to be filmed like that. It was just not necessary and kinda confusing.

Tara: The pantry scene and it just felt flat as most of the episodes this time in the season usually do for some reason. I heard it said that this could have been one of the first episodes that were filmed.

Beth: The scene at the dinner table with Bree playing the psychology game. I felt that was a waste of time other than to set the stage for my second least favorite thing which was the scene with LJG and the Judge. So, really both were unnecessary in my opinion.

Harmony: That’s an easy one, the sexual encounter between LJG & the Judge. It was completely unbelievable given the time they were in, as well as the status of both these men to be so openly intimate with one another where truly anyone could’ve stumbled upon them in the act. That was a major change that just didn’t work in my opinion.

Blair:  The last episodes are running in a dead heat for me. I cannot choose a favorite between.

Susan:  This is getting harder and harder to do with so many episodes! Lol This may be number eight on my list.

Stephanie: It’s one of my least favorite. You can tell the difference when Matt and Toni write the episodes, they’re always perfect!!

Nancy: I’m waiting until the end to rank the episodes.

Mitzie: 1st*409 / 2nd*405 / 3rd*403 / 4th*404 / 5th*407 / 6th*408 / 7th*411 / 8th*410 / 9th*406 / 10th*401 / 11th*402

Tara: I would have to say 5th.

Beth: Gracious! This is getting difficult. Probably in my bottom 5.

Harmony: I can’t give an exact number ranking, but definitely somewhere within the top 4 for me.

OK. There you have it! Now, it’s your turn. Tell us your thoughts about Episode 411, If Not For Hope. What did you like most? What did you like least? Tell us about it in the comments!


Drums Of Autumn Season 4

ONC Administrators’ Choice Awards – The Best of Outlander Episode 410, The Deep Heart’s Core

January 12, 2019

After a much-needed holiday break, we’re baaaaaaack with the ONC Administrators’ Choice Awards! For this post, we are focusing on last week’s Episode 410, The Deep Heart’s Core.  This week’s voting contributors are Mitzie Munroe, Susan Jackson, Tara Heller, Cameron Hogg, Stephanie Bryant, Nancy Roach, and me, Beth Pittman! Without further ado, the envelope please….

Cameron: Bree’s confrontation of Jamie and Ian about Roger’s disappearance.  It shows that Bree is just as strong and fiery as both of her parents, and despite all that has happened to her, she does not see herself as a victim.

Susan:  The family “meeting” headed up by Bree, calling the menfolks out for almost killing Roger.  Excellent acting by every single cast member.

Stephanie:  Loved when Jamie and Bree are walking in the woods and he “shows” her how she physically couldn’t have fought Bonnet while she was being raped. They shared a common experience, having both been raped. Bree was able to conclude she couldn’t have done anything to stop him, and if she did, he would’ve killed her. These walks seem to strengthen the bond between father/daughter and highlight how much these two really have in common, besides blood.

Mitzie: Seeing for a brief moment a very happy Fraser clan sitting down together having dinner. It’s all smiles and laughter and you can see Jamie’s pride in having his family surrounding him.

Tara:   I just loved Claire and Bree going back and forth about what they missed from the future. I love seeing their mother/daughter exchanges. It’s neat to see they can both talk about their other life together.

Beth:  I know this sounds very simplistic but I loved the moment when all the Frasers are gathered around the dinner table. This is the family Jamie always wanted and the home Claire never had. It’s the one moment of family bliss before all you-know-what breaks loose.

Nancy: Jamie’s and Brianna’s discussion of their mutual rape experiences. It was a difficult conversation and strange bonding experience between a newly acquainted father and daughter.

Cameron:  Jamie telling Young Ian to get up off his knee when he proposes to Bree.  This episode was so emotional, it was a well needed laugh at the end.

Susan:  “Get off your knee, ye eejit.”  I cracked up at that one.

Stephanie:  After Young Ian says, “It would be my honor to take your hand in the holy sacrament of marriage” Favorite line is Jamie’s response “Get off yer knee, idjit” This exchange lightened the tense and awkward scene, allowing the viewer to smile. Jamie then stepped in to talk to Bree, saving her from responding to YI’s proposal.

Mitzie:  “I will find him Lass.I will not rest until I do. You have my word”. Brianna: “I’ll hold you to that vow”.

Tara: “She’s at peace here isn’t she? Aye in her wee garden.” That’s what I hope to have this year in mine. Peace. 🙂

Beth:  “Get off yer knees, ye idjit.”  The one moment of comic relief in a very serious episode.

Nancy: The White Sow would say when Claire and Bree were reminiscing about food they missed from the future, “Hamburgers, messy cheeseburgers, with all the fixings from Carnies” and “ Peanut butter and jelly sandwiches. With the White Sow it is always about food.

Cameron:  This episode really spotlighted Sophie Skelton.  I’ve not been a huge fan of her portrayal until the past couple episodes, but this episode really impressed me.

Susan:  I’ll have to give a group award for this one:  Sophie, Cait, Sam and John win for the blow-up scene.  Every emotion and action was perfectly portrayed.

Stephanie:  Best Actor: JAMMF! He has shown and continues to show all the emotions he is feeling without always verbalizing them. For me it’s more what his face and body language say then his words. That’s a true sign of a great actor!!

Mitzie:  This is hard; Richard, Sophie, Sam…. All did wonderful jobs in their character moments. But I am gonna give it to Sam this time. His facial expressions, delivery and screen presence was just spot on. Sophie is a super close second.

Tara:  Sophie. She’s really starting to own her character and we get to see different sides of her acting.

Beth:  Sam! I’m telling you he has been spot on this season with the portrayal of Jamie and I love ALL the emotions he displayed in this episode. And the moment with Bree when he “taught” her that she couldn’t have done anything to prevent what Bonnet did to her was one I had looked forward to from the book. Perfection!

Nancy: This was Bree’s episode. From her difficult conversation with Jamie about her rape, her PTSD dream about having sex with Roger who turns into Bonnet, to her fury when she learns Roger was sold to the Mohawk, Bree held her own in this episode.

Cameron:  I thought the ring switch (which one Bonnet stole from Claire on the ferry) really paid off here.  It made for a big reveal during the scene in which Jamie learns it was really Bonnet who attacked Bree.

Stephanie:  Roger at the stones was surprising. As a book reader, I was initially upset when his hand ALMOST touched the stones, then they cut away! What a relief!! That’s all I’ll say!

Susan:  The Mohawk man’s glance at Roger when he said something about how his carriage awaits–was that a knowing-of-the-future glance?  Or had the Mohawk just seen carriages and spoke enough English that he knew that Roger was being sarcastic?

Mitzie:  I always joke that the slap that Claire laid on Laoghaire in Season 1 was like “The Slap Heard Around the World” but Brianna’s towards Jamie and then her roundhouse punch towards Ian was quite deafening.

Tara:  It’s very slight, but Roger showing up next to Bree and then realizing it was a dream!

Beth: Not really surprising but I was a little thrown by the way the episode ended. How many times have we been left wondering whether someone is going back through the stones or not. Having read the book, I know what’s going to happen and what’s not so I guess unless they totally change the storyline, it’s to throw off non-book readers. I pray the writers don’t change the storyline.

Nancy:   I had two.

  1. Briana’s hitting both Jamie and Ian hard enough to cause Ian’s nose to bleed surprised me. That seemed out of character for a daughter raised by two traditional British parents in the 50’s.  I had to go back and reread this part of the book. Bree did hit Jamie, but I pictured it more as a slap.
  2. Roger’s ability to outrun the Cherokee when he almost collapsed the day before just trying to walk. Starved, dehydrated and exhausted, he still was suddenly able to run. (Also, shouldn’t his wrist be broken, dislocated or at least sprained after hanging by it?) How lucky he was able to keep those two tiny gemstones safe despite all he went through. I would have lost them in the first fight with Jamie.

Cameron:   I know it’s not like the book, and not maybe a popular opinion, but Murtaugh and Jocasta getting together would make me really happy.  Murtaugh deserves a happy ending, and the chemistry between Duncan Lacroix and Maria Doyle Kennedy in just the one scene they shared in this episode is great.  

Susan:  Again, I have to say I love watching the scenes of them “living”–the family meals, working around the homestead.

Stephanie:  Loved the family around the table scene, even though it wasn’t so harmonious this week. It’s a more accurate depiction, families sometimes disagree, argue and have heated words! Although it may have went too far when Bree started hitting people!

Mitzie:  The looks on Lizzie’s, Jamie’s and Ian’s faces when they realized they screwed up royally! You can cut the anguish in that room with a knife it was so thick.

Tara: Seeing more life on the ridge. Seeing Claire in her garden.

Beth: Just seeing them all settling into life on the Ridge. I love that they all feel at home now and that they belong to not only the place but to each other.

Nancy: I enjoyed seeing the Fraser’s working together and dining like a normal, happy family for a change. Of course it didn’t last long. I was also excited to see another White Sow cameo with her trough of beautifully arranged tossed salad.

Cameron:  Claire never takes much responsibility for the Roger/Bonnet mix up.  She could have stopped it all by telling Jamie who the attacker was. I know she promised Bree she wouldn’t, and that Jamie already feels responsible for helping Bonnet escape, but it still makes me mad that Claire stays so angry with Jamie, when she’s not innocent in all this.

Susan:  Too much of Roger wandering around.  I know we need to see how he’s suffered, as well as his prisoner companion, but I think they could’ve showed less of that and a little more of life on the Ridge.

Stephanie:  I was a little bored when they kept showing Roger being pulled by the Cherokees. I understand the writers wanted the audience to understand what he was experiencing but I got it rather quickly after the other poor captive fell and barely got up.  (After, he seemed to be a little too healthy conversing with Roger and tied to the tree). Several scenes kept panning to all the Cherokees on horseback, I didn’t need to keep seeing them to know what the situation was.

Mitzie:  Jamie’s actions towards Brianna in the woods to get her to admit that she couldn’t do anything to stop Bonnet from raping her. It was agonizing to read that part in the book. Seeing it wasn’t much better.

Tara:  Bree slapping Jamie and Ian. I mean, I get it she’s pissed and heartbroken but gees pick something up and throw it instead! Jamie can be pissed! Afterall, Bonnet did that night robbing them and killing their friend. Of course he has the right to show his anger like you Bree! Ok, I’m done.

Beth:  I didn’t like the look of disdain Claire gave Jamie after she put the ring on the table. She wasn’t exactly guiltless either. This is one of those instances where it was everbody’s fault and no one’s at all.  

Cameron:   Hard to say an exact ranking, but this is definitely in my top 5.

Susan:  Top five (because have mercy, the episode numbers are running together in my poor brain):  406 is still my favorite, followed by 404, 405, 409, 410.

Stephanie:  Episode 10 wasn’t my number one favorite in the series, the Bree meeting Jamie in Episode 7 can’t be topped in my opinion. But it was at least equal to the others so far. Drums of Autumn is my favorite book, besides Outlander, so I’m satisfied the writers have chosen to use Diana’s most important words and plot points.

Mitzie:   1st*409 / 2nd*405 / 3rd*403 / 4th*404 / 5th*407 / 6th*408 / 7th*410 / 8th*406 / 9th*401 / 10th*402

Tara:  This episode comes in second for me. The best one for me was The Birds and the Bees.

Beth:  This is probably my third favorite of the season behind The False Bride and The Birds and The Bees.

Nancy: I can’t remember where I am on episode ranking anymore. Lol! I think I’m going to wait until the last episode to rank them.

_______________________________________________________

So, now that we’ve voted, it’s your turn? Agree? Disagree? Tell us in the comments who or what gets your vote for “Best” Awards for Episode 410, The Deep Heart’s Core. Leave it in the comments!


Drums Of Autumn Fraser's Ridge Native Americans Outlander North Carolina Pre-Revolutionary War Period River Run Season 4

Episode 410 Recap – The Deep Heart’s Core

January 11, 2019

Guest Post by Cameron Hogg

After last week’s episode, I was especially excited for this week to see the truth about Roger’s disappearance come out, and this episode did not disappoint!

As a devoted Daddy’s girl myself, I love the dynamic building between Bree and Jamie.  This episode starts with a heart to heart between the two of them, but it becomes clear that this is not an episode of “Father Knows Best.”  Jamie does some pretty slick reverse “psychologizing” on Bree here.  He smoothly goes from reassuring Bree that no one thinks less of her “for something {she} didn’t do, but was done to {her},” to turning things around and suggesting that maybe she was “playing with the truth” to cover a mistake.  But it doesn’t take long for Jamie to bring on the brawn to show her there was no way to have prevented what Bonnet did, no matter how strong Bree feels she is or feels she should have been. Man, does this guy know how to create a great teachable moment, or what?  Then the two discuss how Jamie has dealt with his own experiences with BJR at Wentworth.  Scenes like this help show Jamie’s depth and complexity, and I think Sam Heughan plays it beautifully every time.

You may be wondering what poor Roger is up to right about now.  Oh right, he’s being dragged through the mountains by the Mohawk.  Our writers and producers do love a good slog through the wilderness, now don’t they?  At least these treks seem to be getting shorter, and this one had more plot relevance than 15 minutes of Claire hacking through the jungle or Bree limping through the highlands, but I digress…

Meanwhile, back on the ridge- Claire and Bree have an emotional talk about what Bree plans to do regarding her pregnancy.  They discuss all the options, and both are essentially contemplating the loss of a child- Bree is deciding on the future of her pregnancy, and Claire is facing the possibility of losing Bree a second time if Bree chooses to go back to her own time.  Could someone please pass the tissues?

On a lighter note, I loved the exchange between Claire and Bree lamenting all they miss from the future.  From cheeseburgers to Led Zeppelin, toilets to aspirin, this was a sweet moment for the two of them displaying how much they’d missed each other when separated by 200 years also. 

In a nod to Jamie’s nightmares season 2, Bree’s dream sequence includes a loving visit from Roger, showing how incredibly understanding he is and how much he loves Bree but quickly turns terrifying when he is replaced by Stephen Bonnet and we get a taste of the violence Bree likely experienced during her attack, but was mercifully left out in the original scene of their first meeting.  When Lizzie tries to comfort her, Bree realizes that Lizzie has been keeping something a secret and begins putting together that Roger isn’t really missing or back in the 60’s after all.  Side note- does anyone else want to smack Lizzie right about now?  Maybe she needs a Jamie-style teachable moment about not jumping to conclusions. 

Now that Bree knows what’s up, stuff is about to get real… Bree storms in to confront Jamie about his part in the mix up that sent Roger packing.  If that weren’t enough to make you mad at Jamie, then he turns around and accuses Bree of actually lying to cover her pregnancy and claiming to be raped when it was really consensual.  Well now, Jamie deserves slapping too… and Ian doesn’t get left out for his part and gets slapped… hey, Lizzie’s there, can we slap her now too?  Here we really see how Bree is just as fiery as her parents and all heck breaks loose when Jamie gets all indignant again, when Bree calls him on it saying, “you don’t get to be more angry than me!” Go, girl!  During this exchange, Jamie learns that Bonnet was the real rapist when Claire slams the retrieved ring on the table, and the change (from the book) of which ring was taken by Bonnet pays off!

Now comes the time when Jamie and Young Ian acknowledge their mistake and promise to get Roger back.  It’s also here that we learn that Bree is planning to keep the baby, if there’s even the slightest chance that the baby is Roger’s.  But Bree doesn’t trust the menfolk to get it right after all that happened, so she tells Claire she has to go to supervise.  Understandably Claire balks at this as it means she can’t be with Bree when the baby is born.  Bree tries to convince her she’ll be fine… because she has Lizzie.  Is that supposed to be reassuring at this point?  Thank goodness Jamie suggests sending Bree off with Murtaugh to Jocasta’s.  Murtaugh certainly doesn’t seem to mind a visit to Jocasta, and knowing his fondness for Jamie’s mother, could this be foreshadowing of their relationship to come? 

Jamie and Claire argue over the situation and it occurs to me that Claire doesn’t really have a lot of right to be so mad at Jamie for it when she knew it was Bonnet all along.  But Jamie entrusts Murtaugh to find Bonnet after seeing Bree safely to Jocasta’s so that Jamie can kill him, as he’d persuaded Bree not to do when they were recounting the attack at the beginning of the episode…the phrase, “do as I say, not as I do,” comes to mind, but you have to love the protective instinct Jamie has for those he loves.  

Fast forward to the painful goodbyes- Jamie, Claire, and Young Ian are about to ride off on their quest to find Roger, and Bree, Murtaugh, and Lizzie are headed for River Run.  Leave it to Young Ian to provide a bit of levity here, vowing to marry Bree if they can’t find Roger, only to be called an “idjit” by his uncle.  Jamie reassures Bree that there will be no need for that, as he won’t rest until Roger is found. 

Bree arrives safely at River Run, and meets Jocasta, who reacts especially well to a previously unknown pregnant niece appearing on her doorstep, in my opinion.  Maybe Murtaugh being there softened the blow.  Can you tell, I’d love to see him find a little happiness after all this time?

Talk about a cliff hanger! While Jocasta welcomes Bree into her home, Roger is still with the Mohawk when he falls and dangles from a rope over a rocky ledge until the rope snaps and he can finally attempt his escape.  He manages to elude the Mohawk recapturing him and finds himself near a buzzing stone structure.  He has the jewels he received as payment from Bonnet, he’s right there, he reaches out, but does he go?  We’ll have to tune in next week to know for sure!

Cameron Hogg is a North Carolina girl currently living in northern Virginia. She is a mom to twin boys and works in nursing education and clinical practice, which may explain the draw to Claire and the medical aspects of the books and show. She enjoys history and loves to explore the notable sites wherever she goes, but especially those that have a tie to NC and more recently those related to Outlander. She is also a moderator for the Outlander North Carolina Facebook Group. 

Cameron Hogg
Fraser's Ridge Pre-Revolutionary War Period Quotes Season 4

Daniel Boone ~ A North Carolina Legend

January 3, 2019

By Susan Jackson

Unfinished Portrait of Daniel Boone c.1820

Did you notice in “The Birds and Bees” when Jamie was showing Bree the view from the Ridge, and Bree mentions Daniel Boone? Very likely, she was familiar with the television show that aired in the 60’s, if not from history class in school.  Boone was a trapper, hunter, frontiersman, landowner, politician, and in spite of his Quaker birth and upbringing, owned slaves. He is credited with “discovering” the state of Kentucky. He was born in Pennsylvania in 1734, but his family moved to North Carolina around 1750, settling on the Yadkin River in what is now Wilkes County.

Boone was not afraid to defend the white settlements from the Native Americans, and at 16, joined a militia for that reason.  1755 brought the French and Indian War to his region, and he served as a wagoner, and when that was done, he married. He built two cabins, one near the Yadkin, and one on Beaver Creek, and settled down. Eight children later, he and his wife Rebecca moved to Kentucky, and in 1755, he helped arrange a treaty between the Transylvania Company and the Cherokee, who sold the majority of what is now Tennessee and Kentucky to a Richard Henderson, owner of the Transylvania Company.  Boone and other settlers built and lived at a settlement called Boonesboro. The land is now a state park in Kentucky, complete with camping sites and a living history museum.

Boone never returned to North Carolina, and, after losing his land in spite of being a Kentucky representative in the Virginia General Assembly, moved his family to what is now Missouri, where he was given land by the US Government in exchange for clearing the land. Upon his death in 1820, he still owned 850 acres of the homestead.

Much of what was written in the early history books and biographies about Daniel Boone are stuff of legend, and mostly untrue.  One author interviewed Boone, but elaborated a great deal in his book, and other biographies were written about him, mainly to encourage people to settle in Kentucky.  One story goes that he dictated his life story to his grandson, but the papers were eventually lost when a canoe he was traveling in tipped over, and the “manuscript” was lost in the water.  

He was somewhat famous, however, and he didn’t like it much, stating, “Nothing embitters my old age [more than] the circulation of absurd stories … many heroic actions and chivalrous adventures are related of me which exist only in the regions of fancy. With me the world has taken great liberties, and yet I have been but a common man.”  Wonder what he’d have thought of the television series?!

According to findagrave.com, “Seven counties, a national forest, and numerous towns and schools across the United States are named for him.”  The lovely mountain town of Boone, North Carolina is one of those namesakes.  Those of us at the recent Fraser’s Ridge Homecoming got to visit Whippoorwill Academy, where there is a replica of the cabin Daniel and Rebecca lived in and raised their family.  The rocks that form the chimney are from the original cabin.

Appropriately, in Boone, NC, you’ll find the Hickory Ridge Living History Museum, and during the Summer months, they produce the long-running outdoor drama, Horn in the West, portraying the life of Boone and other settlers in the region before and during the Revolutionary War.

Oh, and, according to his son Nathaniel, Daniel Boone never wore a coonskin hat.

Susan Jackson is a mother of four who lives in coastal North Carolina, and is an avid Outlander fan.  Besides reading, she loves cooking and baking, and music.  She is a thyroid cancer survivor and has worked in education most of her life. She hopes to one day blog about her thyroid cancer journey. She is a contributing author for Outlander North Carolina and, among other articles, has previously written about the infamous Stede Bonnet in Will The Real Stephen Bonnet Please Stand Up?