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The False Bride – Outlander 403 Recap

November 21, 2018
Post by Contributing Author, Harmony Tersanschi

“‘How shall I tell ye what it is, to feel the need of a place?’ He said softly. ‘The need of snow beneath my shoon. The breath of the mountains, breathing their own breath in my nostrils as God gave breath to Adam. The scrape of rock under my hand, climbing, and the sight of lichens on it, enduring in the sun and wind.’

His breath was gone and he breathed again, taking mine. His hands were linked behind my head, holding me, face-to-face.
‘If I am to live as a man, I must have a mountain, he said simply.’” (Diana Gabaldon, DOA)

………And a mountain ye have finally found.

We start off episode 403 in 1970 Inverness with Roger playing his guitar (swoon) then handing the keys to his childhood home over to Fiona and her new husband. “I may not read tea leaves like my grannie…..But I can see ye’re in love with her”, ummm yasss Fi, you tell him! What a great start to this episode, I have certainly missed seeing Roger & hearing that accent, as I’m sure many of us have.

We’re then transported back to River Run where Jamie & Claire are bidding farewell to Aunt Jocasta. This was my only issue with the entire episode, the addition of the unneeded conflict between Claire & Jocasta. Again, the harshness of Claire’s attitude is not something that I’m fond of regarding the series, however I was happy to see that it quickly dissipated once River Run was out of sight. On another note, I don’t think I can put into words how much I adore John Bell as Young Ian. He has fully filled the roll in my opinion & is an absolute joy to watch! Listening to him plead his case to Jamie on why he should be permitted to make his own decision regarding the place he will call home, was no exception. Fantastic!

Now on to what I’ve been waiting for all season, yes I know we’re only just now three episodes in, but I have been looking forward to this since reading DOA this past summer. Bree & Roger are reunited once again & on their way to Grandfather Mountain in North Carolina. I loved the parallel of them being in present day N.C. while her parents are also in 18th century N.C.! A slightly awkward and tad stiff performance from Sophie in season three has been replaced by a confident & completely natural embodiment of Bree in this episode. I mean, she totally killed every scene she was in & I couldn’t be happier! The looks between the two, the chemistry, the flirting, the “Minister’s Cat”, the passion, the fight, was all done seamlessly! These two have already brought some of my favorite parts from DOA fully to life and there’s so much more in store. I of course can’t conclude my thoughts on Roger & Bree without mentioning the performance! I was completely lost in Roger’s voice as he sang, and Bree’s expression perfectly mimicked every other woman’s face at the festival, including my own, while he serenaded us all. I had to apologize to my hubby for the sighs of delight that were coming from my mouth as I briefly forgot that he was sitting right there next to me. Luckily he doesn’t mind my Outlander/Jamie/Roger obsession. Although, it’s more lucky for him than it is for me, because no amount of disapproval could come in the way of my ultimate swooning over Roger’s voice, both singing & speaking.Back to our two main characters, Jamie & Claire who are now wandering the woods for a place to call home. Otter Tooth & his skull made their appearance much sooner than I had imagined albeit I fully enjoyed how it was handled within the episode. The scenery was absolutely beautiful and very reminiscent of trails that I’ve personally found myself on since making North Carolina my home. “Jamie look, strawberries”, Claire calls out to Jamie which was all the sign he needed to realize that they had finally found home. A home soon to be called Fraser’s Ridge.To say that I enjoyed this episode would be a vast understatement! The show once again has sucked me in and I found myself wishing it was much longer than a mere 62 minutes. This has now made my anticipation for what’s yet to come even more extreme, please excuse me while I shout “BRING ON THE TIME TRAVEL!”Harmony was born and raised in Ft. Lauderdale, Fl, but found her forever home in the mountains of North Carolina in 2017. She is married to her “Jamie” and the mom of two boys whom she homeschools. Harmony discovered Outlander while Season 2 was showing on Starz, and instantly fell in love with Jamie and Claire’s love story. I’m her spare time, she enjoys being with her family and getting outside to explore their new home in the mountains.

 

 

Cape Fear River Cross Creek Drums Of Autumn Native Americans Outlander North Carolina Pre-Revolutionary War Period Season 4 Slavery

Do No Harm – Outlander Episode 402

November 14, 2018
Post by Contributing Author, Susan Jackson

Whew. I was relieved when Outlander episode 402 was over. I felt heavy-hearted, and had to sit quietly for a while after it was over. One thing I can say is that this show has never been one to keep the awful harshness of 18th century life stuff out of front and center, but that’s what I love about this series. So, let’s dive in to my recap as well as a few thoughts of Do No Harm.

Listening to Jamie and Claire discuss Bonnet and his crew’s robbery is bringing back the “old” Jamie for me–he wants to protect all who are in his care, as he was brought up to do. I had thought he’d be a bit more beat-up looking, but realized that most of his abuse was taking in those amazing rock-hard abs–oh, wait–I can’t get those My Peak Challenge work-out Instagram pics that Sam posts so often out of my mind sometimes–sorry for the digression! But even though Jamie is feeling like letting Bonnet go is his “cross to bear,” it helps us see that Jamie is still a laird in his heart and mind.

Watching the scene of the boat floating upriver and into view of River Run almost took my breath–it was a beautiful sight! It was almost as how I’d pictured it, minus the Spanish moss dripping from the trees, but I was amazed at how “Southern” the house and land looked! Living in North Carolina and near a historic plantation site, I was afraid that they wouldn’t get this right, but this was one location I approve of.

Jamie seemed a little boy as he greeted his aunt, and then had to remember he had a wife to introduce, which I thought was adorable. Jocasta, played by Maria Doyle Kennedy, was much warmer than I remember from the books, and let on early enough that her eyesight had failed over the years. TV Jocasta is very proud of her plantation, almost to the point of bragging, as we hear during the scene when she is overseeing Claire’s fitting.

This is where I get disheartened by the portrayal of Claire so far. I feel like the producers/writers/directors are really trying to make the audience aware that Claire is opposed to slavery, and she speaks out every chance she gets, but in a bossy, pushy way, even to Jocasta, who is their hostess. Yes, Claire is outspoken and a woman of her time, but she knows when to be that 20th century woman while living in the 18th, as well as when not to be. I feel like it’s being overdone. I just haven’t felt any of Claire’s warmth or sense of humor so far–and I know it’s only the second episode of the season, but still.

During the fitting scene, where Phaedre (Natalie Simpson) is making sure Jocasta’s dress fits Claire perfectly, I was thrown by Phaedre’s accent. Trivial, I know, but I was surprised she was speaking with a slight Scots accent. Someone later reminded me that Phaedre was born at River Run, and Jocasta took her in for a house slave (a matter to be discussed later, I’m sure), was reared in the house, and so, learned to speak like Jocasta and Hector. Ulysses’ lack of any accent at all surprised me as well, and again I was reminded that Ulysses was born free, but sold into slavery after the death of his mother. He was bought by a schoolmaster, who educated him, and at the age of twenty, was bought by Hector Cameron, and brought to River Run. Colin McFarlane makes an absolutely amazing Ulysses–I can’t wait to see more of him!

The big news at the dinner party was Jocasta’s decision to make Jamie her heir, and that she is making him her representative for all things River Run. We are soon introduced to Farquard Campbell, the local justice of the peace who schools Jamie on what would happen to freed slaves, if Jamie chose to do so as the new master of River Run, and how it has to be done lawfully. Jamie soon lets Claire know that he’s ready to ditch the plantation, take Governor Tryon up on his offer and head for the hills, where they can live as they please, without slaves. (Like Governor Tryon, Farquard Campbell was an actual figure in North Carolina’s history, and you can read a little about him here.

And then we come to the incident at Jocasta’s sawmill in the woods, where Jocasta’s slaves are working under the watchful eye of her overseer, Byrnes. Rufus had been hit with Byrnes’ lash, and Rufus retaliated by cutting off the overseer’s ear with an ax. By the time Jamie, Claire and Campbell arrive at the mill, Rufus is being hoisted in the air by a sawmill hook, as Byrnes decided to take the matter of the law in his own hands. It was enough of a shock to read this part of Drums of Autumn, and even more so to see it on screen. Jamie forces Byrnes at gunpoint to let Rufus down so Claire can see to his wounds. She, in her typical emotion-driven way, runs to Rufus’ aid almost immediately. Rufus is brought back to the main house, a place he’s never been, and Claire removes the hook, sutures the wound, and offers comfort to him by asking him about his family, (reminiscent of the boar-hunting scene with Geordie in season 1).

Claire receives a stern talking-to from Ulysses that she may not have done the right thing by saving Rufus, and may be risking the well-being all of the slaves at River Run. She definitely needed this jolt into the ways of Colonial laws and slave-owning culture, but she wasn’t convinced. Jamie’s action of handling the situation as he did angers other overseers and slave owners in the area, and the angry mob shows up at River Run, demanding Rufus be released to them so they may hang him, as is the law according to the law of bloodshed. Jocasta, in true blood-is-thicker-than-water fashion, blames Claire’s “foolish ways.” Jamie suggests that Claire ease Rufus’ suffering by giving him something before he has to be released to the mob. Jamie’s prayer by Rufus’ bedside was so moving–I have missed Jamie’s faith in the television series. In the books, it’s part of what makes Jamie Fraser Jamie Fraser to me. Hopefully they’ll pull more of that aspect of him into the show as time goes on.

Eventually, Jamie bravely carries a dead Rufus to the steps of the plantation house, a noose is placed around his neck, and the delirious mob drags him to the nearest tree, and hangs him there, for all of those at River Run to see.

In spite of the necessary plot changes, and what I can only describe as Claire’s haughtiness in this episode, I liked it–I can’t say that I “enjoyed” it. It was expertly acted–Jerome Holder, the actor who portrayed Rufus, was absolutely amazing, and moved me to tears as he spoke of fishing in the river at night, and dreaming of seeing his sister once more. The sets, the costumes–everything–is so well thought out, just like Diana Gabaldon’s research and writing. I am almost never not in awe of what I see on screen.

Thankfully, we have the comic relief in this episode of Rollo’s meeting with a skunk and meeting John Quincy Myers (Kyle Rees)–hernia-free, apparently. 🙂 His character, in book and on the show, reminds me of Mr. Edwards in the Little House books by Laura Ingalls Wilder–a bit of a wild man, unmarried, and making a living in the frontier that is Colonial North Carolina. I hope we see a lot more of him–he makes me miss Angus and Rupert even more!

As darkly as the first two episodes have ended, I can only hope we will be able to see some happiness in episode three. The Frasers have been through so much already, and so have the viewers–I’m ready for some good times to come to them in North Carolina.Susan Jackson is a mother of four who lives in coastal North Carolina, and is an avid Outlander fan.  Besides reading, she loves cooking and baking, and music.  She is a thyroid cancer survivor and has worked in education most of her life. She hopes to one day blog about her thyroid cancer journey. She is a contributing author for Outlander North Carolina and, among other articles, has previously written about the infamous Stede Bonnet in Will The Real Stephen Bonnet Please Stand Up? 

Cape Fear River Drums Of Autumn Pre-Revolutionary War Period Season 4 Wilmington

America The Beautiful

November 9, 2018
Post by Contributing Author, Tara Heller

We made it! Well actually, the Frasers made it to North Carolina!!! But we made it through the dreadful Droughtlander! Now we can bask in the glow of North Carolina and Fraser’s Ridge from our TV!

What a packed episode and the second episode is looking to be even more packed or maybe that was an extended version of what’s to come! WOW!

Starting off, I thought the beginning sequence was quite interesting with the EARLY (almost neanderthal like) inhabitants of the Americas and the stone circles.

Then when those words and numbers appeared on the screen ‘NORTH CAROLINA 1767’, I’m pretty sure I heard a collective cheer from every North Carolina Outlander fan! I turned to my husband and said, I’m sure the North Carolinians either squealed or cheered when they finally saw that.

Right off, I thought the set was amazing! Those buildings looked amazing!

It was rough seeing Hayes hung and seeing Jamie and Lesley go through that. Am I the only one who thought Bonnet had some fancy footwork getting out of that town square?

The opening credits blue grassy style is such a good change. Yes, I will miss the bagpipes. I mean, come on who won’t? However, we are in N.C. now. It’s the soon to be Southern style of music so let’s get use to it, aye?

I loved Lesley’s singing in Gaelic, joined by the rest of the family and then the rest of the tavern.

I felt terrible for Ian as he had a PTSD flashback to Geilis. It was nice despite the circumstances for Ian and Jamie to have that moment and connected. Throughout the earlier scenes with Bonnet, I kept shouting “Don’t trust him!”

The moment Jamie and Claire had in the woods was what I think we all needed. We needed to know that they were the same Jamie and Claire we always knew. It has been a long and tough ride since Claire went back through the stones, reunited with Jamie, went on the cross ocean voyage, were separated again and then were shipwrecked. They needed that connection and probably a vacation.

I sighed when Jamie said,

“After you left me, after Culloden I was dead, and all that time I loved you.

When my body dies, my soul will still be yours. Nothing is lost, Sassenach, only changed.”

There’s just something about that statement and how he said it with his Scottish lilt that got me. I can’t describe it, but I will try. It’s spiritual and I don’t know if it’s I wish my husband would whisper sweet nothings like that to me by a campfire or what but it gave me gooseys and continues to every dang time I hear it, thanks to one Sam Hueghan.

I’m sure it was a bit confusing for non book readers as to who were all the dinner guests at Lillington’s but one or two rather that I recognized were Phillip Wylie and his sister, Judith. What a little twit she is! Will we see more from them? Time will tell!

When they were back in the ‘family huddle’ and Fergus revealed that Marsali was expecting, I loved Jamie’s response was so sweet. I’m not sure what was going on with Claire’s response. Fear for her? Was it what they wanted? If you recall, she had mentioned to Claire that she wanted to enjoy being married to Fergus first before having little wee bairns running around. I don’t blame her! But then again that day in age it was almost expected after tying the knot.

On the road again, or down the river rather- Jamie shared a bit about his Aunt Jocasta. To me it was reminiscent of the Wedding Night scene when Jamie the Storyteller told Claire stories about his family. He had his storyteller voice on and it just made me laugh. I sighed when Jamie presented Claire with the medical chest! It was better than I even imagined! And then when he said,

“24 years ago I married ye, Sassenach, I hope I haven’t ever given you cause to regret it.”

Sigh….he had that little twinkle in his eye. Was he getting teary eyed? I don’t know, but it was sweet and special.

And then it happened that night, the invasion. Bonnet that slippery snake! He had heard everything they had planned and knew what possessions they had on them. Just when the American Dream was beginning for them, it turned into a nightmare! At first, the piano caught me off guard. At first I felt like I was on a Louisiana River boat or something. I hadn’t remembered a piano being on board nor thought it could fit! And then it hit or rather they hit! Bonnet and his thieving men! I felt so violated for them. Honestly, I think the music fit. I know, I know, such controversy but honestly would you wanted to totally hear all the punches and sounds of Jamie getting the crap kicked out of him or Claire’s gasps and cries? Not me! Could they have picked another song? Sure! Are we the producers and writers? Nope! We don’t have a say. Sorry!

And the ring! Frank’s ring was left! I heard (SPOILER ALERT) that it will logistically be easier for Brianna to identify Jamie’s ring down the road and try to recover it. Her mom wore that ring her life when she was growing up so she knows what it looks like. It’s distinct. Either that or Jamie could possibly get Claire a ring that looks more so like the book version of the ring. Food for thought….

What a cliff hanger though! I can’t wait to see how things get all sorted out.

I’m so glad to have the show back on the air. It feels like I’m reunited with old friends! It feel so good. Warm and cozy too going into the Fall, Winter and Holiday time! And can I just say, Hot dang the Laird Jacket is back!

Well there you have it, my recap of Season 4 Episode 1, until next time!

Tara Heller is the mother of two boys, who lives in South Central Pennsylvania. However her heart is the South. Although she is fairly new to Outlander, she has truly immersed herself in it. She also loves history, especially the 18th century, genealogy, visiting the coast, spending time with family and blogging atwww.ladyoutnumbered321.com.  You can read about her MPC story here.
A Breath of Snow And Ashes Drums Of Autumn Edenton Revolutionary War Period

A Trip Back In Time To Colonial Edenton – Part 2

October 25, 2018
Post by Contributing Author, Susan Jackson

Chowan County Courthouse (Photo By Kip Shaw)

My previous article that focused on the beginnings of formal government in the Colonial town of Edenton, North Carolina, was an easy post to get together.  But Edenton is so rich in history, that honing in on one subject to write about next was kind of difficult for me. I wanted a piece that had some correlation with Claire Fraser–she is our heroine, after all!  I was looking through photos of Edenton, and I kept seeing the lovely Penelope Barker House at the Edenton waterfront, because it’s always a popular choice for photographers and visitors. Then it hit me: Penelope Barker was one of the strong–and probably feisty–women of the Revolutionary period in Edenton, just like Claire!  She may not have been a time-traveling healer who settled in the wilds of the North Carolina highlands, but she had a toughness that only a woman who had experienced hardship can have, and plenty of influence, because she was a woman of genteel birth.

We’ve all learned about the Boston Tea Party, and how Bostonians were sick and tired of taxation without representation, and how they dumped tea (not ice-cold, sweet tea, but the leaves that make tea!), into the Boston Harbor in protest to King George’s demands. Well, Penelope Paggett Barker, who, before the age of seventeen was an orphan, ran the family plantation while raising her dead sister’s children, was widowed twice before age 20 with boys of her own, and the richest woman in the state of North Carolina, (she married up, y’all), decided that she would organize a little tea rebellion of the Southern kind.

Penelope’s third husband, Thomas Barker, sailed to England in 1761 as an agent of the Crown for North Carolina, and because of her personal history, was confident that Penelope would be able to handle all of their affairs while he was away.  Thomas was stranded in London, thanks to the blockade of American ships, and was away for seventeen years! During his time abroad, the Revolution was in high gear, and soon, Patriot leaders were encouraging the Colonists to rebel against the ridiculous taxes when Parliament passed the “intolerable acts” after the Boston rebellion. Leaders encouraged the women of the Colonies to boycott cloth and tea from Britain, both of which were mainstays of life in the 18th century.

So, Penelope Barker took action.

In the Autumn of 1774, Mrs. Barker hopped into her carriage and hit the streets of Edenton, and convinced the women of the town that they should fully support the rebellion of the King’s taxes.  Someone drafted a resolution, which read, in part,

“We the ladyes of Edenton do hereby solemnly engage not to conform to ye pernicious Custom of Drinking Tea or that we, the aforesaid Ladyes, will not promote ye wear of any manufacture from England, until such time that all Acts which tend to enslave this our Native Country shall be repealed.”

About fifty women signed the resolution, and held their tea party at the home of Elizabeth King on October 25, 1774, enjoying tea made of mulberry leaves and other local herbs.

The first political women’s protest  in the country took place in little ol’ Edenton, North Carolina.

But that wasn’t the end of it.

Penelope reportedly sent a copy of the resolution to London, and it was published in newspapers  and magazines by early 1775. While the resolution was celebrated in the Colony, the British were shocked, and a popular cartoon was soon making the rounds that caricatured the women as promiscuous and not taking care of their children! (See a photo of the actual cartoon below.)  The leaders were appalled that women would dare protest so publicly, and one man, Loyalist Arthur Iredell, wrote to his brother, James in Edenton, and asked him if there was a Woman’s Congress in Edenton as well, and sarcastically said that those loyal to the British Crown had plenty to worry about with women fighting for the Patriots.  What a jerk.

Women of the Colonies were resourceful and found plenty of local substitutes for products they were not using from England. The local teas that Colonists continued to brew during this period of rebellion caught on, and there was even one blend that was dubbed “Liberty Tea,” reportedly made up of red rose petals, linden blossoms, elder, red clover, violets and goldenrod, according to the Women History Blog.

To commemorate these courageous women, there is a 250-pound bronze teapot statue atop a Revolutionary War Cannon near where Elizabeth King’s home once stood.  It was placed there in 1905 by farmer Frank Wood, who lived at Hayes Plantation where Penelope is buried. Wood commissioned foundry man Frank Baldwin of Watertown, Connecticut to create the memorial using a silver teapot once owned by a former North Carolina governor Samuel Johnston as a model.

I know the Edenton Tea Party time has passed by the time of the setting of ABOSAA, but  maybe, just maybe, Diana Gabaldon decides in BEES, (book nine, currently being written), that Claire needs to meet the remarkable Penelope Barker. These two remarkable women could get a lot accomplished if they were to put their heads together!  

So, while you’re enjoying a glass of ice cold tea–with sugar, if you’re Southern–think about the women who stood up for themselves and their hopes for independence, who foraged for leaves and flowers that they had to pick, dry, and store just to have a nice cup of tea.  Raise your glass to Penelope Barker, strong, courageous leader of Edenton, North Carolina.

The Penelope Barker House, which serves as the Welcome Center for Edenton and Chowan County, is located at the waterfront end of Broad Street in Edenton.  It’s a beautiful three-story house that used to sit a few blocks north when Penelope and her family lived in it. If you’re visiting Edenton, stop in at the Barker House, where you’ll learn about the Historic Walking Tour, and other historic facts and places about the town.  For hours and directions, visit http://ehcnc.org/places-of-interest/the-barker-house/ .  For even more information, check out these links: Visit Edenton and Historic Edenton. 

Have you ever visited Edenton or heard of Penelope Barker, the Edenton Tea Party and their place in Revolutionary War history?  What about Penelope reminds you of Claire?

Susan Jackson is a mother of four who lives in coastal North Carolina, and is an avid Outlander fan.  Besides reading, she loves cooking and baking, and music.  She is a thyroid cancer survivor and has worked in education most of her life. She hopes to one day blog about her thyroid cancer journey. She is a contributing author for Outlander North Carolina and, among other articles, has previously written about the infamous Stede Bonnet in Will The Real Stephen Bonnet Please Stand Up? 
Drums Of Autumn Edenton

A Trip Back In Time To Colonial Edenton ~ Part One

July 17, 2018
Post by Contributing Author, Susan Jackson

Chowan County Courthouse (Photo By Kip Shaw)

Edenton, North Carolina. This town conjures up many images in my mind, including ones of original colonial architecture, old cemeteries, Christmas candlelight tours, the Annual Pilgrimage of Historic Sites and one of the South’s prettiest towns. Situated in the northeastern part of the state on the Albemarle Sound and Chowan River and located in Chowan County (the former and the latter are named for the Chowan Indians), Edenton is listed in the U.S. National Register of Historic Places, with 342 contributing buildings, 4 contributing sites, and 3 contributing structures.

Outlander readers are first introduced to Edenton in Drums of Autumn. Jamie & Claire have arrived in Wilmington and have been invited to attend a dinner party with Governor Tryon at the home of a Mr. Lillington. A young man, a “dandy” as Claire notes and his somewhat snarky sister are in attendance at the dinner. The man’s name is Phillip Wylie, a wealthy landowner from Edenton. Edenton’s history, however, goes back much further than the 18th century in which Claire finds herself so let’s do a little time traveling.

Settlers in the northern areas of the New World began to feel crowded, and started venturing south. It wasn’t easy to travel south past coastal Virginia because of the Dismal Swamp. (Yes, that would be the same Dismal Swamp where Young Ian and William find themselves in An Echo In The Bone). Not to be deterred, however, these determined early settlers were able to find a way to get to the area which is now Edenton by way of the Chowan & Roanoke Rivers and the Albemarle Sound plus the many tributaries and creeks which surround it. This was a wild territory but offered abundant food sources and fertile land for farming.

The earliest knowledge of settlers near the Chowan River is in the 1650’s. These people had to be pretty scrappy to live in this area – keeping peace with the native people, battling the abundant “muskeetoes,” withstanding hurricanes, and having to work themselves into the ground just to live. Visiting ministers noted that women dressed like “ladies,” but would man a boat barefooted, or carry a gun into the woods and bring home supper! (This was no Little House on the Prairie, y’all!) It was so sparsely populated, that people lived by their own rules, and some historians believe it was comparable to the Wild West of television. Someone, somewhere needed to take control of these unruly folks, keep the peace, and make some money off this rich and “goodly” land.

Enter King Charles II, great uncle to the Bonnie Prince. (Mark me, you can always count on a Stuart.)

King Charles II

In 1653, he issued a land grant to eight men, who he called the Lords Proprietors, for this newly formed tract of land named “Carolina” in honor of King Charles I. These men were:

1. John Berkeley, 1st Baron Berkeley of Stratton
2. Sir William Berkley (Poor guy came up shy in the title department)
3. Sir George Carteret, 1st Baronet
4. John Colleton, 1st Baronet
5. Anthony Ashley Cooper, 1st Earl of Shaftesbury
6. William Berkeley, 1st Earl of Craven
7. Edward Hyde, 1st Earl of Clarendon
8. George Monck, 1st Duke of Albemarle

The Eight Lord Proprietors

Handsome devils, they, these Lords Proprietors were appointed not only to try to govern the lawless people there, but to make money from the sale of land that settlers from the north so badly wanted to live on. With titles such as Lord, Sir, Duke & Earl, it is easy to assume these men were already well off, but can one ever have enough money? And so, the Albemarle region, which included the area which is now Edenton, was created and the settlers came.

It took some time and money to get the people and land a little more organized. In 1712, present-day Edenton was named “ye towne on Queen Anne’s Creek,” and leaders put forth a motion to build a courthouse. The governing body would normally meet in plantation homes, but this was getting difficult, and they needed a home base. The stick frame courthouse was built, however, the Towne had little other proof they were “civilized”, except for half acre lots in the town around the courthouse. When Governor Charles Eden died in 1722, leaders decided to officially incorporate the town, and they called it Edenton, in honor of the deceased governor. The growing town became the capital for the North Carolina province from its incorporation to 1743.

The original courthouse was soon replaced by two more buildings. Apparently, the town board wasn’t happy with the location, or perhaps, the architecture – whoever knows? – and in 1767 (this would be the same year Jamie, Claire & clan came to North Carolina), replaced it with the simple but beautiful brick and mortar Georgian-style building we can see today.

Historic Chowan County Courthouse

Now is a perfect time to visit Edenton, named by Forbes Magazine as one of the South’s Prettiest Towns in 2008. They have a walking tour, as well as a trolley to hop on and tour the town. If you want to see original Colonial architecture and some of the most beautiful historic homes in the United States, Edenton is the place to go and spend a day, a weekend or even longer!

Would you be willing to step back in time to the beginnings of Edenton? Also, if you’ve visited Edenton, tell us about it in the comments. We’d love to hear from you!

Wait! Maybe you’ve never visited Historic Edenton but would you like to? Check out these links for more information on where to stay plus what to see and do:  Visit Edenton and Historic Edenton.

Susan Jackson is a mother of four who lives in coastal North Carolina, and is an avid Outlander fan.  Besides reading, she loves cooking and baking, and music.  She is a thyroid cancer survivor and has worked in education most of her life. She hopes to one day blog about her thyroid cancer journey. She is a contributing author for Outlander North Carolina and has previously written about the infamous Stede Bonnet in Will The Real Stephen Bonnet Please Stand Up?