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Memories of Fraser’s Ridge Homecoming 2019

October 26, 2019

It’s only been three weeks since we left the Ridge after an amazing second Fraser’s Ridge Homecoming, but it seems like months! We have to apologize for a somewhat lengthy absence, but the second Homecoming event was worth all of our time and energy. We’d like to share some attendees experiences and photos with everyone, as well as our exciting news for Homecoming 2020!  Today’s experience is from Debbie Morelock!

“So, what was it like to go back in time for a few days and get in touch with my inner Sassenach and for my husband, his inner Highlander? Aye lass and lassie, it was awesome!  Getting to Leatherwood Resort wasn’t a bad drive from TN and GPS kept us on track. After a lot of curvy roads, some paved and others not so much, which helped make us feel like we were being transported back in time, pulling in to Leatherwood was a welcome sight. Let me tell you, it is an absolutely gorgeous place. Tucked neatly on the side of the mountain with a little creek and horse barns, it’s peaceful and beautiful!

Checking in was simple and quick. In no time, we had the keys and directions to our cabin. My husband and I resisted the urge to go on to the Fraser’s Homecoming check in and drove on to our cabin to unload and freshen up.  Then it was off to registration and begin our Fraser’s Ridge Homecoming 2019 weekend!

First impression of checking in for the weekend’s activities? I was in awe at how well it was streamlined! And the tote bag full of goodies that we each got was a nice surprise! From an Outlander 2020 calendar, to a zippered notepad with pen, to a book of short stories from a local author, to cute themed pins and a sticker, there was just so many things! The best part of all during check in was hearing the bagpipes being played! And seeing Highlanders dressed in their kilts marching up and down the field calling commands only added to the sights and sounds. Talk about having the hair on your arms and back of your neck stand up! Were we still in NC or did we really go back home to Scotland? You know the old saying “The devil is in the details.”? Well, I could tell after checking in, Beth and her crew were certainly going to beat that devil to death over this weekend or die trying. I knew we were in store for an amazing time! There is no way I can begin to name every little detail I noticed that went into everything, there were so many!

We spent the rest of Thursday afternoon on the scavenger hunt looking for charms that depicted different parts of the Outlander series. The finale was getting up to Craigh na Dun cabin and the standing stones!  From where we were, we could also see Grandfather Mountain off in the distance. All I can say is WOW! Soon it was time for the Hello the House Welcome Party. There was lots of yummy hors d’ oeuvres, live music and what we had all been waiting for: The Calling of the Clans! It was so fun to hear all the different clans being represented as each flaming torch was placed in the fire. Sadly, we were too tired to stay for the ghost stories and headed back to the cabin.

Friday brought several different workshops that we had signed up for oh, and did I mention it was hot yesterday? It was in the mid 90’s and Friday turned out the same. We were sweating buckets, but we had so much fun! Probably my favorite workshop was listening to The Tale of the Regulators. Lunch was a wonderful beef stew and at dinner the barbecue and fixings was so good. During dinner we officially welcomed Shaun Alexander, world traveler and YouTube vlogger and his wife, Teka to the gathering. It’s so cool that they came across the pond to be here and share this weekend with us and with his fans around the world! When the costume contest took place, I was so impressed with everyone’s costumes. The contestants came dressed and ready to win. Then we watched the Druid Lantern Dance performed just like in the opening scenes of Outlander! AMAZINGLY BEAUTIFUL is all I can say.

Saturday brought a complete change in weather. It started to mist and temperatures dropped! I think somehow Beth planned it that way to give us a real feeling of being in the Scottish Highlands! The workshops Saturday were even better! I enjoyed having a one on one with the genealogist and gathered some tips on researching more of our family history. My husband had a great time with the hawk and knife throwing. Lunch was so good! I had shepherd’s pie and my husband had the smoked pork tacos. After lunch I went to hear the 18th century doctor. I could have stood there in the drizzling rain all day. It was so interesting! My husband participated in the flint fire building class and really liked it. I have a feeling he will be building his own hawk throwing target before too long and a place to practice his flint fire making skills.

Soon it was time to go warm up and change for dinner. This was the evening we’ve been waiting all year for! I dressed in my Scottish skirt and blouse and my husband looked so dashing in his kilt.  The tables were set and decorated in a rustic fall foliage and a mixture of different plaids. We enjoyed tender venison, chicken and mashed potatoes with roasted kale. Dinna fash, I’m getting to the dessert. Warm toffee sticky pudding and apple dumplings. Do I need to say more? The music by Celtic Connections was hauntingly beautiful. But the icing on the cake was the surprise Beth had for us all. A video giving us the dates for next year’s gathering as well as the guests who will be attending with us next year!!! Yes, I screamed along with everyone else when we saw who it was. Welcome to Fraser’s Ridge 2020!!!!  Annette Badland (Mrs. Fitz), Gary Lewis (Colum Mackenzie), and Graham McTavish (Dougal Mackenzie)!!!! How are we supposed to sleep after this? Much less wait for next October to hurry and get here?

Sunday, time to pack up and check out of our cabin. No, I did not want to. We closed out our time at the Homecoming listening to Capt. Robert K. Rambo (U.S. Military, Ret.) portraying Attakullakulla, Peace Chief and First Beloved Man of the Cherokee from 1761 to 1775. WOW, just WOW! I don’t know what else I could even say.

After all the goodbyes and see ya laters to our new found friends, it was time to head back to our time and to life off the Ridge. I can’t begin to thank Beth and her crew enough for all of the time they spent planning and getting everything together and ready for us. I was right though, the devil in all the details sure was beat up one side and down the other.  How will they possibly outdo this year? I have no clue, but I have no doubt they will!”

Debbie, thank you so much for recapping your weekend with us at Leatherwood Mountain Resort! We can’t wait to be with you and your husband again next year!

For more photos of our wonderful weekend, go to the Fraser’s Ridge Homecoming 2020 Facebook page (whether you have a Facebook account or not!) and scroll through!

Dates for next year’s Homecoming are October 8-11, 2020.  The projected date for ticket sales to begin is February 1, 2020.  This date gives us plenty of time to be sure that plans are finalized, and the big stuff is in place!  We do know that the 71st NC Highlanders will be returning, as well as the Warriors of AniKituhwa. Our special guests next year include television series cast members Annette Badland, Graham McTavish, and Gary Lewis!  Saying we’re already looking forward to next year is an understatement!

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Fact or Fiction? Jamie Fraser & North Carolina Land Grants

August 16, 2019

Guest post from Traci Thompson

“It has long been the policy both of the Crown and of myself, Mr. Fraser, to encourage the settlement of land in the Colony of North Carolina by intelligent, industrious, and godly families, to the furtherance of the prosperity and security of all.” He lifted his cigar, took a deep lungful and exhaled slowly, pausing to cough. “To this end, sir, there is established a system of land grants whereby a large acreage may be given to a gentleman of means, who will undertake to persuade a number of emigrants to come and settle upon a part of it under his sponsorship. This policy has been blessed with success over the last thirty years; a good many Highlanders and families from the Isles of Scotland have been induced to come and take up residence here. Why, when I arrived, I was astonished to find the banks of the Cape Fear River quite thick with MacNeills, Buchanans, Grahams, and Campbells!”

The Governor tasted his cigar again, but this time the barest nip; he was anxious to make his point.


“Yet there remains a great deal of desirable land to be settled, further inland towards the mountains. It is somewhat remote, and yet, as you say, for men accustomed to the far reaches of the Scottish Highlands – “


“I did hear mentions of such grants, sir,” Jamie interrupted. “Yet is not the wording that persons holding such grants shall be white males, Protestant, and above thirty years of age? And this statement holds the force of law?”


“That is the official wording of the Act, yes.” Mr. Tryon turned so that I saw him now in profile, tapping the ash from his cigar into a small porcelain bowl. The corner of his mouth was turned up in anticipation; the face of a fisherman who feels the first twitch on his line.


“The offer is one of considerable interest,” Jamie said formally. “I must point out, however, that I am not a Protestant, nor are most of my kinsmen.”


The Governor pursed his lips in deprecation, lifting one brow.


“You are neither a Jew nor a Negro. I may speak as one gentleman to another, may I not? In all frankness, Mr. Fraser, there is the law, and then there is what is done.” He raised his glass with a small smile, setting the hook. “And I am convinced that you understand that as well as I do.”


“Possibly better,” Jamie murmured, with a polite smile.

~Drums of Autumn, Chapter 7, “Great Prospects Fraught With Peril.” (Circa 1767)

These paragraphs from Drums of Autumn introduced a long-running source of conflict for the story by giving Governor Tryon a certain leverage over Jamie – if Jamie doesn’t toe the line with Tryon, will Tryon play the religion card, “expose” Jamie as a Catholic, and take his land away from him?

But how much weight does this threat really carry…and are the details historical fact, or historical fiction?

First, as a land grant is central to the story, let’s take a brief look at what a North Carolina land grant was. Although “land grant” is the term often used, the technical term was “land patent.” Land patents transferred vacant land from a granting authority to a private person. North Carolina patents did not convey “free” land; grants were for some kind of service to the colony, or for a required payment of fees. There were two land grant systems in North Carolina: one was headright patents, in which land was granted for the service of bringing settlers into the colony, with a certain number of acres granted per transported person. This system ended by 1754, before Jamie and Claire’s time in NC. The second was purchase patent, land in exchange for fees paid at every step in the process. By the mid-1750’s, this was the only kind of patent granted in North Carolina, and thus the kind of grant Jamie would have received if he were really here in the 1760s.(1)



There were in fact a few, but not many, of enterprises such as Tryon describes: “…a large acreage may be given to a gentleman of means, who will undertake to persuade a number of emigrants to come and settle upon a part of it under his sponsorship.
” These were a type of headright patent, as the stipulation was bringing in emigrants to populate the colony. Harry Merrens states in Colonial North Carolina in the Eighteenth Century, “Grants were generally small…A few persons did manage to obtain large quantities of land either for speculative purposes or for building up large estates. Extensive holdings of land were so rare that neither practice was common…”(2)

The most notable person who engaged in this rare land speculation in NC was Henry McCulloh, a London merchant and colonial official whose family roots were in Scotland. He received two grants in his own name of 60,000 and 72,000 acres, and a third under the names of two of his trustees for 1.2 million acres. The condition of these grants was that quitrents on the lands be paid, and that settlers be installed on the land (3):

“At a Council held at Wilmington [NC] the 24th day September 1741… His Excellency having informed the Board That it was His Majesty’s Pleasure signified in some of his Majesty’s Instructions to Mr. McCulloh, that for the future all persons taking up lands should be obliged to seat the same according to their rights, i.e. with the person in whose right the land shall be taken up; But that such as have already obtained Warrants, shall only be obliged within three years from the date of their respective Grants to put a white man on every Tract 1,000 acres or under And two on a tract of 2,000 or above a thousand…And that the Secretary draw up a proclamation to give publick notice thereof…His Excellency…took notice of the absolute necessity of encouraging white persons to settle in this Province particularly the back parts of the same…” (4)

Pamphlet by Henry McCulloh, which he wrote after returning to England, hoping to impress the King, and get another appointment to the Colonies. (from NCPedia)

Merrens calls McCulloh “the unrivaled leading speculator in North Carolina” and reports that he was “’hawking it [the land] about in small quantities thro’ all the back parts of the Province and quite thro’ America even to Boston’”(5) as well as transporting Ulster Scots and Swiss emigrants into the colony.

But what of the “Protestant” requirement? McCulloh’s petitions for his grants in the 1730s do include wording such as “…Praying for a Grant of Twelve hundred Thousand Acres of Land in North Carolina in Consideration of Settling 6000 Protestants…” (6) and “…praying for a Grant of Lands upon the heads of the Pedee Cape Fear and Neus Rivers in North Carolina, and proposing to make a Settlement thereon of six thousand Swiss Palatines and other Foreign Protestants within the space of Ten years from the Date of {the} Grant…” (7) Other earlier petitions have the same wording, such as a 1679 petition to the British Privy Council to transport “about 80 Protestant families to Carolina aboard the frigate Richmond” and a request from Normandy seeking “sanction and assistance in projected planting of about fourscore Foreign Protestant families, being skilled in the Manufactures of Silks, Oyles, Wines, etc. who are willing to settle in Carolina.” (8) What is the reason for this? The religious situation in Europe was one of many reasons for emigration during this period, especially the desire to seek freedom of worship. Speculators such as Henry McCulloh were aware of the need to transport Protestants – particularly Scots-Irish, Swiss, and Germans – to the colonies. And as the Crown needed settlers and revenue, this was a win-win situation for all involved. (9) Another consideration for the Crown may have been loyalty, as Protestants were less likely to have divided allegiances. The greater number of Protestant settlers in North Carolina led to the statement made by the real Governor Tryon in 1765 that “every sect of religion abounds here except Roman Catholicism.” (10)

What is important to realize is that these references to settlement of Protestants in North Carolina did not refer to land law. In fact, North Carolina, especially as compared to the other colonies, was liberal in regards to religion. While there certainly was anti-Catholic sentiment, the only specific discrimination against them in legal policy regarded holding public office, and instructions given to the Royal Governor in the 1730s to permit “a liberty of conscience to all persons (except papists).” (11) It is likely that such instructions fell under Governor Tryon’s assertion that “there is the law, and then there is what is done,” as many such instructions relating to the Church of England were never able to be enforced in North Carolina. In 1679, the instructions of the Lords Proprietors to the Governor of Albemarle County, NC stated, “You are to take notice that wee doe grant unto all free persons that doe come to plant in Carolina before the 25th day of December, 1684…sixty akers of land…” and makes no mention of religion. (12) And not all of the land speculators’ petitions included the “Protestant” wording – McCulloh’s proposal of 1735/6 mentions sending over workmen and “such people as I intend to send there from Europe” to North Carolina and does not mention religion. (13)

A far more important consideration to the Crown regarding land patents was, as with most enterprises, money. Much of the energy and focus of the government documents relating to land grants of the period revolve around revenue generated or, most notably, the lack thereof. Even money took a back seat at times to the pressing need to simply have people in the colonies; in 1715, by decree from London, even impoverished families that could not pay rent were not to be deprived of their land, and those that had been were to have their property restored. (14) Also, land grants were a clear title in fee simple; the owner could sell or devise land absolutely at his pleasure and without consultation with government officials. (15)

These questions having been discussed, what of the age requirement? The 1679 document mentioned earlier made the specific provision for “sixty akers of land” to any free person who was “above the age of sixteen yeares.” (16) North Carolina, being an English colony, followed English common law; under English law one could buy or be granted land at any age but could not sell it in his own name until he arrived at the age of 21. (17)

As this overview shows, populating the colony and generating revenue were important considerations to North Carolina officials of the colonial period. To purposely attempt to divest a settler of his land would run contrary to the goal and would in fact be illegal; to do this for religious reasons in a tolerant colony would be difficult if not impossible, and there was no legal age restriction on land ownership. Happily, were Jamie actually here in the 1760s, he would not have had these issues to worry about.

The case: Are the details historical fact, or historical fiction?
Verdict: FICTION.

There you have it–straight from a North Carolina genealogist’s pen! Thanks, Traci, for this insight about land grants and the many different cultures that emigrated and settled here to make up this great state!
Traci Thompson is a married mother of two who lives in eastern North Carolina, and is, of course, an avid Outlander fan.  Traci is a Certified Genealogist and Local History & Genealogy Librarian. She is a contributing author for Outlander North Carolina.

Still shots of Jamie/Gov. Tryon are from https://outlander-online.com

Reference notes:
1 Margaret M. Hofmann, “Land Grants,” in Helen F.M. Leary, editor, North Carolina Research: Genealogy and Local History, 2nd edition (Raleigh, NC: North Carolina Genealogical Society, 1996), chapter 31.
2 Harry Roy Merrens, Colonial North Carolina in the Eighteenth Century: A Study in Historical Geography (Chapel Hill, NC: UNC Press, 1964), p. 25-26.
3 Mattie Russell, “McCulloh, Henry,” NCPedia (https://www.ncpedia.org/biography/mcculloh-henry : accessed 2019), citing William S. Powell, ed., The Dictionary of North Carolina Biography (Chapel Hill, NC: UNC Press, 1991.)
4 “Minutes of the North Carolina Governor’s Council, September 21, 1741 – September 29, 1741,” “Colonial and State Records of North Carolina,” Documenting the American South, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (https://docsouth.unc.edu/csr/index.php/document/csr04-0177 : accessed 2019); citing volume 4, p. 597-603
5 Merrens, Colonial North Carolina in the Eighteenth Century: A Study in Historical Geography, p. 26.
6 “Declaration by Murray Crymble and James Huey concerning their actions as agents for Henry McCulloh,” in “Colonial and State Records of North Carolina,” Documenting the American South, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (https://docsouth.unc.edu/csr/index.php/document/csr05-0289 : accessed 2019); citing volume 5, p. 769.
7 “Order of the Privy Council of Great Britain concerning Henry McCulloh’s land grants in North Carolina,” Great Britain, Privy Council, May 19, 1737, in “Colonial and State Records of North Carolina,” Documenting the American South, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (https://docsouth.unc.edu/csr/index.php/document/csr05-0289 : accessed 2019); citing volume 4, p. 253-254.
8 Finding aid to the British Records: Privy Council, citing Office Register, 21 April 1679-29 May 1680, Public Record Office, London, England, P.C. 2/68, North Carolina State Archives, Raleigh; digital images (https://files.nc.gov/dncrarchives/documents/files/ffa_br_privycouncil.pdf : accessed 2019).
9 Stewart E. Dunaway, Henry McCulloh & Son Henry Eustace McCulloh: 18th Century Entrepreneurs, Land Speculators of North Carolina (Lulu.com: Dunaway, 2014), p. 16.
10 Anne Russell & Marjorie Megivern, North Carolina Portraits of Faith: A Pictorial History of Religions (Norfolk, VA: The Donning Company, 1986), p. 136.
11 “Instructions to George Burrington concerning the government of North Carolina George II, King of Great Britain, 1683-1760; Great Britain. Board of Trade,” in “Colonial and State Records of North Carolina,” Documenting American South, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (https://docsouth.unc.edu/csr/index.php/document/csr03-0060 : accessed 2019); citing volume 3, p. 90-118.
12 “Instructions to the Governor of Albemarle County Carolina. Lords Proprietors. February 05, 1679,” in “Colonial and State Records of North Carolina,” Documenting the American South , University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (https://docsouth.unc.edu/csr/index.php/document/csr01-0098: accessed 2019); citing volume 1, p. 235-239.
13 “Proposal by Henry McCulloh concerning his efforts to settle people in North Carolina,” in “Colonial and State Records of North Carolina,” Documenting the American South , University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (https://docsouth.unc.edu/csr/index.php/document/csr05-0289 : accessed 2019); citing volume 4, p. 156.
14 David Southern and Louis P. Towles, “Land Grants and the Recruitment of Settlers to the Carolina Colony,” NCPedia (https://www.ncpedia.org/land-grants-part-3-land-grants-and : accessed 2019), citing William S. Powell, ed., Encyclopedia of North Carolina (Chapel Hill, NC: UNC Press, 2006.)
15 George Stevenson, “Foreword” (Raleigh, NC, June 1982) to Margaret M. Hofmann, Colony of North Carolina, 1735-1764, Abstracts of Land Patents Volume One (Weldon, NC: Roanoke News Company, 1982).
16 “Instructions to the Governor of Albemarle County. Carolina. Lords Proprietors. February 05, 1679,” in “Colonial and State Records of North Carolina,” Documenting the American South, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (https://docsouth.unc.edu/csr/index.php/document/csr01-0098 : accessed 2019); citing volume 1, p. 235-239.
17 Lee Albright & Helen F.M. Leary, “Strategy for Land Records,” p. 43, in Helen F.M. Leary, editor, North Carolina Research: Genealogy and Local History, 2nd edition (Raleigh, NC: North Carolina Genealogical Society, 1996), chapter 2, “Designing Research Strategies.”

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From Scotland to North Carolina~Part 2:Why North Carolina?

July 3, 2019

guest post from Traci Thompson

In past blog posts, we’ve looked at the circumstances that led to many Highland Scots emigrating from Scotland. Our next question is, why did they immigrate to North Carolina? 

A major impetus appears to be Gabriel Johnston, a Lowland Scot who served as Governor of North Carolina from 1734 to 1752. “He felt it would be good for the future of the Cape Fear Valley for it to be settled by large numbers of Protestant Highland Scots, so he began writing enthusiastic letters to friends in Scotland, inviting them to come to a land where there were two crops each year…land grants and possible exemption from taxation for time.” [Douglas F. Kelly, Carolina Scots (Dillon, SC: 1739 Publications, 1998), p.82-83.] 

Gabriel Johnston’s Coat of Arms bookplate

Not everyone was enthusiastic about Governor Johnston’s partiality, however. “Among other charges brought against the Governor [in 1748] was his inordinate fondness for his brother Scotchmen, even Scotch rebels. His partiality for this latter class of Scotchmen, it was said, was so great, and his lack of joy at the king’s ‘glorious victory at Culloden’ was so conspicuous, that he was accused of a want of fealty to the House of Hanover…” Nevertheless, “…like other Scotchmen, he was fond of the people of his native country, and sought to better their condition by inducing them to emigrate to North Carolina…” [William L. Saunders, ed., The Colonial Records of North Carolina, Volume IV, 1734-1752 (Raleigh, NC: P.M. Hale, 1886), prefatory notes, p. ix-x.] 

There were some Scots living in the colony earlier; before 1700, several Lowland Scots were present, and it is believed that Highlanders were living in the Cape Fear area as early as 1725. After Governor Johnston began to promote immigration into the colony, the first large group of Highlanders disembarked in September 1739. A party of 350 from Argyllshire, they made their way up the Cape Fear to settle in the Cross Creek area; the Cape Fear was convenient due to the ports of Brunswick and Wilmington, and the river for transportation farther upstream. In February 1740, two of the leaders of the Argyllshire colony appeared before the Colonial Legislature asking for special consideration for ”themselves and several other Scotch Gentlemen and several poor people brought into this province” and for “substantial encouragement, that they might be able to induce the rest of their friends and acquaintances to come over.” The Upper House responded favorably with tax exemptions and land grants, and the immigration to North Carolina continued. [Saunders, p. viii-ix; Duane Meyer, The Highland Scots of North Carolina (Raleigh, NC: Carolina Charter Tercentenary Commission, 1963), chapter III, “Settlement”; R.D.W. Connor, History of North Carolina, Vol. I (Chicago, IL: Lewis Publishing Co., 1919); digital transcription, http://penelope.uchicago.edu/Thayer/E/Gazetteer/Places/America/United_States/North_Carolina/_Tex ts/CBHHNC/1/10*.html : accessed 2018.] 

Names associated with the 1739 party include McNeil, Forbes, Hamilton, Jones, and Campbel. “At a meeting of the council held at Wilmington, June 4, 1740, there were presented petitions for patents of lands, by the following persons, giving acres and location, as granted.” Note the prevalence of Highland names – do you recognize any from Outlander? 

Name. Acres. County.
Thos Clarks 320 N. Hanover
James McLachlan 160 Bladen
Hector McNeil 300
Duncan Campbell 150
James McAlister 640
James McDugald 640
Duncan Campbell 75
Hugh McCraine 500
Duncan Campbell 320
Gilbert Pattison 640
Rich Lovett 855 Tyrrel
Rd Earl 108 N. Hanover
Jno McFerson 320 Bladen
Duncan Campbell 300
Neil McNeil 150
Duncan Campbell 140
Jno Clark 320
Malcolm McNeil 320
Neil McNeil 400
Arch Bug 320
Duncan Campbel 640 Bladen
Jas McLachlen 320
Murdock McBraine 320
Jas Campbel 640
Patric Stewart 320
Arch Campley 320
Dan McNeil 105; 400
Neil McNeil 400
Duncan Campbel 320
Jno Martileer 160
Daniel McNeil 320
Wm Stevens 300
Dan McNeil 400
Jas McLachlen 320
Wm Speir ? Edgecombe
Jno Clayton 100 Bladen
Sam Portevint 640 N. Hanover
Charles Harrison 320
Robt Walker 640
Jas Smalwood 640
Wm Faris 400; 640
Richd Canton 180 Craven
Duncan Campbel 150 Bladen
Neil McNeil 321
Alex McKey 320
Henry Skibley 320
Jno Owen 200
Duncan Campbel 400
Dougal Stewart 640
Arch Douglass 200 N. Hanover
James Murray 320
Robt Clark 200
Duncan Campbel 148 Bladen
James McLachlen 320
Arch McGill 500
Jno Speir 100 Edgecombe
James Fergus 640
Rufus Marsden 640
Hugh Blaning 320 (surplus land) Bladen
Robt Hardy 400 Beaufort
Wm Jones 354; 350

“Occasionally, a list of emigrants has been preserved in the minutes of the official proceedings. Hence it may be read that on November 4, 1767, there landed at Brunswick, from the Isle of Jura, Argyle-shire, Scotland, the following names of families and persons, to whom were allotted vacant lands, clear of all fees, to be taken up in Cumberland or Mecklenburgh counties, at their option: 

Names of land grantees

These names show they were from Argyleshire, and probably from the Isle of Mull, and the immediate vicinity of the present city of Oban.” 

Those who came to Carolina and prospered wrote letters home, and thus word of mouth became a catalyst for emigration. “There was in fact a Carolina mania which was not broken until the beginning of the Revolution. The flame of enthusiasm passed like wildfire through the Highland glens and Western Isles.” [J.P. MacLean, An Historical Account of the Settlements of Scotch Highlanders in America… (Glasgow, Scotland: John McKay, 1900), Chapter 5, “Highlanders in North Carolina”; digital transcription, Electric Scotland (https://www.electricscotland.com/history/highlands/chapter5.htm : accessed 2018]. 

Drawing of the port at Charleston, SC, where many Scots first
set foot in the New Land.

As a result, “Shipload after shipload of sturdy Highland settlers sailed for the shores of America, and most of them landing at Charleston and Wilmington found their way to their kinsmen on the Cape Fear. In a few years their settlements were thickly scattered throughout the territory now embraced in the counties of Anson, Bladen, Cumberland, Harnett, Moore, Richmond, Robeson, Sampson, Hoke, and Scotland…The Scot’s Magazine, in September, 1769, records that the ship Molly had recently sailed from Islay filled with passengers for North Carolina, and that this was the third emigration from that county within six years. The same journal in a later issue tells us that between April and July, 1770, fifty-four vessels sailed from the Western Isles laden with 1,200 Highlanders all bound for North Carolina. In 1771, the Scot’s Magazine stated that 500 emigrants from Islay and the adjacent islands were preparing to sail for America, and later in the same year Governor Tryon wrote that ‘several ship loads of Scotch families’ had ‘landed in this province within three years past from the Isles of Arran, Durah, Islay, and Gigah, but chief of them from Argyle Shire and are mostly settled in Cumberland County.’ Their number he estimated ‘at 1,600 men, women, and children.’ A year later the ship Adventure brought a cargo of 200 emigrants from the Highlands to the Cape Fear, and in March of the same year Governor Martin wrote to Lord Hillsborough, secretary of state for the colonies: ‘Near a thousand people have arrived in Cape Fear River from the Scottish Isles since the month of November with a view to settling in this province whose prosperity and strength will receive great augmentation by the accession of such a number of hardy, laborious and thrifty people.’” [Connor, http://penelope.uchicago.edu/Thayer/E/Gazetteer/Places/America/United_States/North_Carolina/_Tex ts/CBHHNC/1/10*.html: accessed 2018]. 

Such massive immigration to North Carolina has led to claims that the state now has more descendants of Scots than has present-day Scotland. In summary, favorable reports, support of the crown and governor, and financial incentives all conspired to make the ship route of Scotland to the Cape Fear a major migration pattern. As MacLean poetically described the aftermath of Culloden, 

“Left without chief, or protector, clanship broken up, homes destroyed and kindred murdered, dispirited, outlawed, insulted and without hope of palliation or redress, the only ray of light pointed across the Atlantic where peace and rest were to be found in the unbroken forests of North Carolina.”

Traci, thank you so much for this history lesson! Traci is our resident historian and genealogist! Learn more about the Scots heading inland along the Cape Fear River! Do you have ancestors that began in the Cape Fear Region? Tell us about it!

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My Weekend in Burlington, NC with Diana Gabaldon

June 17, 2019

Photo essay by Connie McKenzie

I first met my favorite author in Winston-Salem last year.  Never in a million years did I think I’d be able to meet her again!  However, I was fortunate enough to attend two of the events held in Burlington, NC, on April 27 & 28, 2019, thanks to our dear friend, Kimberly Kandros, manager of Development & Special Projects at the NC Department of Natural and Cultural Resources.  She was instrumental in getting Diana back to NC.  

Saturday evening, we met at the Paramount Theater in Burlington. First, there was a speech from “Herself” with Q&A, followed by a book signing.  I was front row, center, for this fascinating event and was in awe with every word.  I visited with friends I’ve made through the Outlander effect. I even met Diana’s husband, Doug.  He is just as kind and friendly as Diana. However, I spent more time with him than her. LOL After the event, several of us walked across the street to grab a bite to eat and drink and visit with each other. Such a lovely evening.

On Sunday morning I was so excited about the brunch with Diana at the Alamance Battleground, that I arrived a little early.  I visited with Kimberly, look around the gift shop, and got first dibs on seating. It wasn’t long before another attendee, Marybeth Krichilsky, arrived and we chatted and started taking pictures.  The tables were beautifully set under a tent on the grounds. One of the first things we saw was a dragonfly which kept landing on Diana’s place setting. How ironic. I was going to let Diana know, but when I finally could talk with her, I totally forgot.  

Diana mentioned how she’d had to take allergy medicine since being here. (North Carolina was in high pollination that weekend!)  She included a little background of herself, her process, how she researches her material for her books. While writing, she sometimes will stop and pick something else up when she needs a break.  She can be working on several projects at one time and does this frequently.

The main topic of the day was, of course, the Regulators and events that led to the Alamance Battle.  This was a taxpayer rebellion. Governor Tryon raised taxes to pay for his palace. The people didn’t want this since they could barely could pay for food, supplies, etc.  When the Governor sent out tax collectors, they started raising taxes on their own and keeping the extra money. The Governor didn’t like this and told them to stop, but he couldn’t enforce it.  This ended up with the Hillsborough Riot and the Alamance Battle. The backcountry people didn’t stand a chance against the cannons. Diana then read from “The Fiery Cross.”

We had the most delicious brunch which included fresh strawberries and fruit, quiches, muffins, dainty squares, salmon, and salad.  It was interesting to know that some of the attendees drove or flew hours to get here! The furthest an attendee traveled was from California. One attendee which I had met at another Outlander event, Thru the Stones, in Iowa, was Lisa Margulies.  It was so good to see her again.  

After brunch, we walked to various parts of the Alamance Battlefield where Diana read to us from “The Fiery Cross” at each location.  We even saw the wild strawberries all over the ground. I was totally fascinated with this whole experience. I also really loved this being such a small group and being able to spend longer in her presence.  The book signing was last, and I didn’t want it to end. Diana is such an educated, talented, beautiful lady, inside & out. She never ages, never meets a stranger, always has a smile on her face, always accommodating, and so loving and generous! All the proceeds from the events go directly to the Battleground. (The land surrounding the historic Battlefield is at risk for development, and purchase of the land by the Save Alamance campaign will keep it in its natural state.)

There are so many wonderfully kind people in this Outlander Fandom.  I’m amazed on how many new friends I have made due to this Outlandish journey.

Connie, thanks so much for sharing your photos and summary of your amazing weekend!

Diana Gabaldon NC Historic Sites Outlander North Carolina Pre-Revolutionary War Period The Fiery Cross

On the Trail of History: A Journey through Diana Gabaldon’s North Carolina Part III

June 7, 2019

Guest post by Lisa A. Margulies

Blog editor note: Sorry for being so long in between part II and this last part of Lisa’s trip to North Carolina, outlandish readers! Between life and then the Memorial Day holiday weekend, well, it’s taken a while to get back to blogging. We appreciate each one of you who visit ONC, and especially for sticking with us when things get in the way of posting, especially our guest posts! Now, let’s hear from Lisa!–SHJ

Early tales of colonial unrest can be traced to many locations and times in American history. Seeds of rebellion have significant roots in the colony of North Carolina in the years before the Revolutionary War. The War of Regulation is one such seed woven in the fabric of Diana Gabaldon’s The Fiery Cross, the fifth book in her epic Outlander series. In April 2019, the North Carolina Department of Natural and Cultural Resources (NCDNCR) hosted Diana at historical sites that correlate with her Outlander story. As Diana Gabaldon is my all time favorite author and storyteller, I just had to travel from my home state of Iowa to make this historical trek with her (unfortunately not as a member of her entourage but as an attendee at these events). Here is my third and final recount of the journey.

~I have tried to minimize spoilers for the fifth book and fifth season of Outlander. Please note that I do refer to actual history and do reference Diana’s storytelling from this point forward. The event recap is impossible to share without suggesting the Battle at Alamance and the story within are included in The Fiery Cross.~

From my first two stops in coastal New Bern, I traveled to the Piedmont region of North Carolina and the Alamance Battleground, just south of Burlington, to attend a morning of history sharing appropriately entitled, “Experience Outlander at Alamance with Diana Gabaldon.” Alamance Battleground lies off country highways forested in lush green hardwoods and conifers and is situated unassumingly along the banks of the Great Alamance Creek. I drove to the entrance of this historical site where I was greeted by a man in a kilt passing out lanyards to the attendees of the small and private Sunday brunch to be held with Diana as the guest of honor. The 40 in attendance were mostly Diana Gabaldon fans of her books and/or TV series but also patrons of this historical site. We gathered at the history center to await Herself before moving to a tent set up to offer intimacy during brunch and spoken words. Not a bad seat in this house! The beauty and excitement of the day were held in check by the ever present nature of the field and history’s solemn surround.

The Site Manager at Alamance Battleground, Jeremiah DeGennaro, welcomed us all to the preservation site and passed the introduction of Diana over to the Deputy Secretary of North Carolina’s Department of Natural and Cultural Resources, Dr. Kevin Cherry. He spoke of the “Outlander Effect” on North Carolina’s historical sites. I had the privilege of sitting with Dr. Cherry at a previous weekend event where he asked me if I had ever heard of Tryon Palace before reading a DG book. My honest answer was “No.” This is a perfect example of the “Outlander Effect.” Just happy that my ignorance has been a good thing for tourism.

Diana was welcomed to the podium and shared the question she is often asked, “Why are you here?“ Her answer is that North Carolina history is very much Scottish history. Ever the historian, Diana reviewed Scottish immigration to the Carolinas and its relevance to her story. She has traveled the state many times to gain knowledge and understanding of the Scottish immigrant’s place in the history here. Because so many Scots settled in the coastal and the backcountry regions, Diana was able to continue the saga of her Outlander characters in this place and time with her gusto of storytelling.

Scots in conflict with the governing powers was not a new concept and the N.C. backcountry climate was a great set up for the author. The Alamance Battle of May 1771 was, in a way, the first battle of the Revolutionary War, a sort of “kick off” revolt, a taxpayer grievance to the Royal Governor William Tryon and his palace. Diana paused and looked around the field, noting a simple log cabin in the distance. She referenced the TV series Fraser cabin from season 4. The “Big House” to come in season 5 is a “glamping” equivalent of the cabin here – just wait and see. The set designer does not skimp! New settlers in the Carolina colony would have had spade and ax beginnings. Another aside: Carolina has mosquitoes and Scotland has midges.

Back to 1771… The farmers and backcountry settlers of N.C. did not want an elegant palace bought and built with taxpayer money. They felt alienated from the laws and established society of the Eastern governing region. Their economy was based on very little cash, a barter system of trade due to geographic isolation. If citizens were unable to pay taxes, their property was confiscated. Although tax collectors were directed not to do this by Tryon and the Assembly, they couldn’t be stopped. Not enough militia existed to oversee the corrupt sheriffs and other officials so far into the backcountry. The opposition to this extortion became the War of Regulation. Riots and revolts took place in Hillsborough and discontent reached New Bern. Governor Tryon appointed colonels of militia from wealthy and prominent social man in order to help combat the dissent. Men like (the fictional) Jamie Fraser were charged to outfit others in the community while men like Quaker Herman Husband were chosen by the disgruntled citizens as leaders sent to Tryon looking for peaceful resolution. The conflict and violence ensued despite all efforts.

On that note, the brunch buffet was opened. Much appreciation goes to Kimberly Kandros here as she was the chief organizer of the entire Diana/historic site/lineup/schedule. She and others from the NCDNCR offered a full weekend of educational nourishment for the mind and body! (Shout out to Michelle‘s Kitchen & Table from Burlington for the actual feeding of our bodies – totally delicious!)

After our lovely meal, Elaine O’Kal, an Alamance Battleground volunteer and all around Outlander enthusiast, became our tour guide. She began by setting the stage for us with the history of the area coming into 1771. The Loyalist-appointed militia consisted of 16-to-60-year-old free white men from each county. Prominent men were made Colonels and Captains. They were responsible for road and bridge maintenance as well as keeping the peace. When the fictional Jamie and Claire Fraser arrived to North Carolina in 1767 much discontent was already was brewing. By 1768, the Regulator Movement had officially formed. The men wanted to regulate their own affairs. The previously mentioned Quaker Herman Husband and Scots-Irish citizen James Hunter were leaders of the movement expressing grievances about fees, corrupt sheriffs, and Anglican-only officials. Under representation existed in government in regards to population dispersion in the counties (see photo of county map for reference). Diana’s fourth Outlander book, Drums of Autumn, points out the geographic population disparities and corrupt court officials and dishonest sheriffs. To illustrate the mounting tension, Diana read a passage from The Fiery Cross. The actual history directly compared to Diana’s fictional story only reinforces the reader’s understanding of the immense and finely detailed research Diana puts into her work.

Our group of 40 plus “students” followed Ms. O’Kal to a spot on the historic site. Here she pointed out that forces from both sides had gathered in Orange County some 5 miles apart. Despite the large number of Regulators assembled, Tryon sought to confront the uprising and moved his camp of men and ammunitions just a half mile away from the disorganized Regulator camp. Ms. O’Kal directed our attention to the physical space upon which we stood and nearness in proximity to what would have been the Regulator camp just across the creek bed. (See map photos.) It was here a most special treat ensued. The mic was passed between the two women storytellers. The historian would detail the Alamance gathering, and the author would read a passage from The Fiery Cross. This began a volley in time and space between the actual event and the fictional story. We were experiencing the timeline of history in real time with narration in real space. What an extraordinary shift of mind and body!

Ms. O’Kal had placed us on the battlefield where just 300 feet separated the forces. These were men that knew one another, lived in the same communities–and were, perhaps, related–looking across the creek at each other! Our guide spoke of Loyalist figures like David Fanning and Richard Caswell on the Militia side. These men are featured in Diana‘s books, Fanning being a pretty all-around bad guy and Caswell being a notorious pipe smoker. This last fact was advantageous in a medical procedure performed by our heroine Claire. Our guide shared details of the provisions and camp layouts of each side as well. The Militia forces were organized, armed and outfitted where as the Regulators lacked leadership, were in a state of disarray and had little in the way of arms. The 2000 men gathered on that side believed the sheer number of their forces would sway the Governor to listen to grievances. But the time for negotiations had long past in his eyes, and Tryon’s 1000 men were charged to end this uprising once and for all.

Diana read a passage from The Fiery Cross that elaborated upon the conditions of the backcountry farmers and disgruntled citizens. Quaker Herman Husband voiced these concerns in an intimate setting to his friends, Jamie and Claire. The book passage includes an actual letter from Governor Tryon who was known for his incessant letter writing. This emphasis once again serves as a reminder to me of the careful and accurate inclusion of history that Diana Gabaldon, the meticulous researcher, has included in her fictitious novels.

Back to Elaine O’Kal. She pointed out that many men involved in this battle went on to be government leaders after the Revolutionary War. Several are noted in Diana’s books because they are in direct contact with the Frasers or have an impact in American history during the span of the Outlander story. We already know that Royal Governor Tryon granted land to Jamie and made him a colonel of militia, thus setting up a relationship for future interactions between the two men. Diana has skillfully interjected Jamie Fraser into the Alamance conflict at the height of tense negotiations.

Elaine O’Kal recounted this strain on the morning of May 16, 1771 by citing the proclamation Governor Tryon sent across the creek to “those who style themselves Regulators.” In it, he gives the lawbreakers a chance to surrender peacefully or face consequences in one hour’s time. DG then read a passage from The Fiery Cross illustrating this history. In it, Militia Colonel James Fraser pleads with Governor Tryon to speak to Regulator and Quaker Herman Husband so a peaceful resolution may be found and blood be not shed. If Husband can be convinced to cross the creek and talk, will he, Tryon, not save the lives of these, his citizens? Both our guide and our novelist have orchestrated a sense of urgency on this morning just as it must have been on that May morning. And as we step nearer the creek bed, Ms. O’Kal points under our feet to a “slope covered with teeny yellow-flowered plants” – a detail observed by a major character in The Fiery Cross as he, too, crossed this path! Flowers, Quakers, and creeks – oh my! We are in the pages of history!

~A most emotionally charged, beautifully written passage from chapter 62 in The Fiery Cross was read by Diana at this time. I have chosen not to share details because I fear too much of her chilling storyline would be given away by my doing so. Suffice to say, in my notes I have written, “WOW,” and I remember that jaw dropping, moving feeling at the end of her recitation vividly.~

The hour had expired at midday. Documented accounts of the war cry given by Governor Tryon atop his horse were shared by both women, “Fire, Goddamn you! Fire on them or on me!” Diana’s last shared passage came from Jamie‘s point of view during the battle. It dramatically described the pitting of neighbor upon neighbor, and even family upon family. True to her style, Diana transports the reader, and in this case, the listeners, to the place and time of her characters. My heart was racing and I know how the story ends – both of them!

The Battle of Alamance effectively ended the Regulator Movement in North Carolina. Ms. O’Kal shared details of the short battle. The ill-outfitted and ill-prepared Regulators were no match for the Militia men with a battle plan, guns and cannons. A large boulder remains in the field today, its solemn significance noted for the little cover it provided the defeated Regulators. In less than two hours, nine Militia soldiers and up to 100 Regulators died, many were injured on both sides, 15 Regulators were taken prisoner, one was hung on the field of battle without trial, six were executed later. Two months later, Governor Tryan left to become Governor of the colony of New York, taking Edmond Fanning as his personal secretary. As he told James Fraser, he had done his duty. He did not leave the colony in a state of disorder and rebellion for his successor.

The volley of history and historical fiction ended on this somber note. Event guests were free to roam the grounds as we waited for Diana to be available for pictures and autographs. I took this time to wander, and read posted signs and visit that restored log cabin. This is the actual cabin built by Herman Husband’s brother-in-law, John Allen. A battlefield scene from The Fiery Cross takes place in a log cabin. Could this be where Diana’s inspiration was kindled? In her brunch speech, the author did note that this cabin example would be typical of a backcountry log cabin during the Fraser’s North Carolina time. My self-guided tour definitely did not indicate a glamping scenario. (See pictures!)

I was one of the last to get autographs and pictures from the weekend’s star attraction. I suppose I didn’t want to be transported back to my time and place. I have been fortunate to meet Diana Gabaldon and a few others associated with the Outlander series at prior events. This being the case, I did not bring a “big book” for autographing, but instead brought a personal photo and my own “wee medicine box.” I’d like to think Diana remembered my box as she perused the accumulated familiar signatures. She graciously signed “best regards” in Gaelic to (me) and posed for a few quick pictures. So hard to believe my journey through Diana Gabaldon’s North Carolina has come to an end. Thank you readers for trekking along my three part history trail!

Many, many thanks go to Outlander North Carolina, Beth Pittman and Susan Jackson, for inviting me to share this journey – a wonderful opportunity made possible by these two lovely ladies. I’d like to recognize all the people working at Alamance Battleground for their contributions to the success of this event. Elaine O’Kal did an extraordinary job sharing history and coordinating the presentation with Diana. Thanks to Jeremiah DeGennaro, Ann Hunnicutt and all the crew at this special site.
The North Carolina Department of Natural and Cultural Resources deserves an entire weekend of ovations. Dr. Kevin Cherry, Kimberly Kantros and Jennifer Farley get special recognition for their efforts.
And, as always, my deepest appreciation goes to Diana Gabaldon for the sharing of her life, her time, her incredible talents, her humor…and her husband (Doug Watkins) with us all! Where would we be without DG?!?!

Lisa, we cannot thank you enough for your wonderful memories of your weekend in North Carolina! Come back soon!

If you’re ever on a DIY Outlander tour of North Carolina, don’t forget to stop at the Alamance Battleground historic site, as well as the many other real places that are host to the Frasers and their family and friends! Speaking of an Outlander tour–have you ever traveled to Outlander destinations? Tell us about it!