Browsing Category

Pre-Revolutionary War Period

Cape Fear River Cross Creek Drums Of Autumn Native Americans Outlander North Carolina Pre-Revolutionary War Period Season 4 Slavery

Do No Harm – Outlander Episode 402

November 14, 2018
Post by Contributing Author, Susan Jackson

Whew. I was relieved when Outlander episode 402 was over. I felt heavy-hearted, and had to sit quietly for a while after it was over. One thing I can say is that this show has never been one to keep the awful harshness of 18th century life stuff out of front and center, but that’s what I love about this series. So, let’s dive in to my recap as well as a few thoughts of Do No Harm.

Listening to Jamie and Claire discuss Bonnet and his crew’s robbery is bringing back the “old” Jamie for me–he wants to protect all who are in his care, as he was brought up to do. I had thought he’d be a bit more beat-up looking, but realized that most of his abuse was taking in those amazing rock-hard abs–oh, wait–I can’t get those My Peak Challenge work-out Instagram pics that Sam posts so often out of my mind sometimes–sorry for the digression! But even though Jamie is feeling like letting Bonnet go is his “cross to bear,” it helps us see that Jamie is still a laird in his heart and mind.

Watching the scene of the boat floating upriver and into view of River Run almost took my breath–it was a beautiful sight! It was almost as how I’d pictured it, minus the Spanish moss dripping from the trees, but I was amazed at how “Southern” the house and land looked! Living in North Carolina and near a historic plantation site, I was afraid that they wouldn’t get this right, but this was one location I approve of.

Jamie seemed a little boy as he greeted his aunt, and then had to remember he had a wife to introduce, which I thought was adorable. Jocasta, played by Maria Doyle Kennedy, was much warmer than I remember from the books, and let on early enough that her eyesight had failed over the years. TV Jocasta is very proud of her plantation, almost to the point of bragging, as we hear during the scene when she is overseeing Claire’s fitting.

This is where I get disheartened by the portrayal of Claire so far. I feel like the producers/writers/directors are really trying to make the audience aware that Claire is opposed to slavery, and she speaks out every chance she gets, but in a bossy, pushy way, even to Jocasta, who is their hostess. Yes, Claire is outspoken and a woman of her time, but she knows when to be that 20th century woman while living in the 18th, as well as when not to be. I feel like it’s being overdone. I just haven’t felt any of Claire’s warmth or sense of humor so far–and I know it’s only the second episode of the season, but still.

During the fitting scene, where Phaedre (Natalie Simpson) is making sure Jocasta’s dress fits Claire perfectly, I was thrown by Phaedre’s accent. Trivial, I know, but I was surprised she was speaking with a slight Scots accent. Someone later reminded me that Phaedre was born at River Run, and Jocasta took her in for a house slave (a matter to be discussed later, I’m sure), was reared in the house, and so, learned to speak like Jocasta and Hector. Ulysses’ lack of any accent at all surprised me as well, and again I was reminded that Ulysses was born free, but sold into slavery after the death of his mother. He was bought by a schoolmaster, who educated him, and at the age of twenty, was bought by Hector Cameron, and brought to River Run. Colin McFarlane makes an absolutely amazing Ulysses–I can’t wait to see more of him!

The big news at the dinner party was Jocasta’s decision to make Jamie her heir, and that she is making him her representative for all things River Run. We are soon introduced to Farquard Campbell, the local justice of the peace who schools Jamie on what would happen to freed slaves, if Jamie chose to do so as the new master of River Run, and how it has to be done lawfully. Jamie soon lets Claire know that he’s ready to ditch the plantation, take Governor Tryon up on his offer and head for the hills, where they can live as they please, without slaves. (Like Governor Tryon, Farquard Campbell was an actual figure in North Carolina’s history, and you can read a little about him here.

And then we come to the incident at Jocasta’s sawmill in the woods, where Jocasta’s slaves are working under the watchful eye of her overseer, Byrnes. Rufus had been hit with Byrnes’ lash, and Rufus retaliated by cutting off the overseer’s ear with an ax. By the time Jamie, Claire and Campbell arrive at the mill, Rufus is being hoisted in the air by a sawmill hook, as Byrnes decided to take the matter of the law in his own hands. It was enough of a shock to read this part of Drums of Autumn, and even more so to see it on screen. Jamie forces Byrnes at gunpoint to let Rufus down so Claire can see to his wounds. She, in her typical emotion-driven way, runs to Rufus’ aid almost immediately. Rufus is brought back to the main house, a place he’s never been, and Claire removes the hook, sutures the wound, and offers comfort to him by asking him about his family, (reminiscent of the boar-hunting scene with Geordie in season 1).

Claire receives a stern talking-to from Ulysses that she may not have done the right thing by saving Rufus, and may be risking the well-being all of the slaves at River Run. She definitely needed this jolt into the ways of Colonial laws and slave-owning culture, but she wasn’t convinced. Jamie’s action of handling the situation as he did angers other overseers and slave owners in the area, and the angry mob shows up at River Run, demanding Rufus be released to them so they may hang him, as is the law according to the law of bloodshed. Jocasta, in true blood-is-thicker-than-water fashion, blames Claire’s “foolish ways.” Jamie suggests that Claire ease Rufus’ suffering by giving him something before he has to be released to the mob. Jamie’s prayer by Rufus’ bedside was so moving–I have missed Jamie’s faith in the television series. In the books, it’s part of what makes Jamie Fraser Jamie Fraser to me. Hopefully they’ll pull more of that aspect of him into the show as time goes on.

Eventually, Jamie bravely carries a dead Rufus to the steps of the plantation house, a noose is placed around his neck, and the delirious mob drags him to the nearest tree, and hangs him there, for all of those at River Run to see.

In spite of the necessary plot changes, and what I can only describe as Claire’s haughtiness in this episode, I liked it–I can’t say that I “enjoyed” it. It was expertly acted–Jerome Holder, the actor who portrayed Rufus, was absolutely amazing, and moved me to tears as he spoke of fishing in the river at night, and dreaming of seeing his sister once more. The sets, the costumes–everything–is so well thought out, just like Diana Gabaldon’s research and writing. I am almost never not in awe of what I see on screen.

Thankfully, we have the comic relief in this episode of Rollo’s meeting with a skunk and meeting John Quincy Myers (Kyle Rees)–hernia-free, apparently. 🙂 His character, in book and on the show, reminds me of Mr. Edwards in the Little House books by Laura Ingalls Wilder–a bit of a wild man, unmarried, and making a living in the frontier that is Colonial North Carolina. I hope we see a lot more of him–he makes me miss Angus and Rupert even more!

As darkly as the first two episodes have ended, I can only hope we will be able to see some happiness in episode three. The Frasers have been through so much already, and so have the viewers–I’m ready for some good times to come to them in North Carolina.Susan Jackson is a mother of four who lives in coastal North Carolina, and is an avid Outlander fan.  Besides reading, she loves cooking and baking, and music.  She is a thyroid cancer survivor and has worked in education most of her life. She hopes to one day blog about her thyroid cancer journey. She is a contributing author for Outlander North Carolina and, among other articles, has previously written about the infamous Stede Bonnet in Will The Real Stephen Bonnet Please Stand Up? 

Cape Fear River Drums Of Autumn Pre-Revolutionary War Period Season 4 Wilmington

America The Beautiful

November 9, 2018
Post by Contributing Author, Tara Heller

We made it! Well actually, the Frasers made it to North Carolina!!! But we made it through the dreadful Droughtlander! Now we can bask in the glow of North Carolina and Fraser’s Ridge from our TV!

What a packed episode and the second episode is looking to be even more packed or maybe that was an extended version of what’s to come! WOW!

Starting off, I thought the beginning sequence was quite interesting with the EARLY (almost neanderthal like) inhabitants of the Americas and the stone circles.

Then when those words and numbers appeared on the screen ‘NORTH CAROLINA 1767’, I’m pretty sure I heard a collective cheer from every North Carolina Outlander fan! I turned to my husband and said, I’m sure the North Carolinians either squealed or cheered when they finally saw that.

Right off, I thought the set was amazing! Those buildings looked amazing!

It was rough seeing Hayes hung and seeing Jamie and Lesley go through that. Am I the only one who thought Bonnet had some fancy footwork getting out of that town square?

The opening credits blue grassy style is such a good change. Yes, I will miss the bagpipes. I mean, come on who won’t? However, we are in N.C. now. It’s the soon to be Southern style of music so let’s get use to it, aye?

I loved Lesley’s singing in Gaelic, joined by the rest of the family and then the rest of the tavern.

I felt terrible for Ian as he had a PTSD flashback to Geilis. It was nice despite the circumstances for Ian and Jamie to have that moment and connected. Throughout the earlier scenes with Bonnet, I kept shouting “Don’t trust him!”

The moment Jamie and Claire had in the woods was what I think we all needed. We needed to know that they were the same Jamie and Claire we always knew. It has been a long and tough ride since Claire went back through the stones, reunited with Jamie, went on the cross ocean voyage, were separated again and then were shipwrecked. They needed that connection and probably a vacation.

I sighed when Jamie said,

“After you left me, after Culloden I was dead, and all that time I loved you.

When my body dies, my soul will still be yours. Nothing is lost, Sassenach, only changed.”

There’s just something about that statement and how he said it with his Scottish lilt that got me. I can’t describe it, but I will try. It’s spiritual and I don’t know if it’s I wish my husband would whisper sweet nothings like that to me by a campfire or what but it gave me gooseys and continues to every dang time I hear it, thanks to one Sam Hueghan.

I’m sure it was a bit confusing for non book readers as to who were all the dinner guests at Lillington’s but one or two rather that I recognized were Phillip Wylie and his sister, Judith. What a little twit she is! Will we see more from them? Time will tell!

When they were back in the ‘family huddle’ and Fergus revealed that Marsali was expecting, I loved Jamie’s response was so sweet. I’m not sure what was going on with Claire’s response. Fear for her? Was it what they wanted? If you recall, she had mentioned to Claire that she wanted to enjoy being married to Fergus first before having little wee bairns running around. I don’t blame her! But then again that day in age it was almost expected after tying the knot.

On the road again, or down the river rather- Jamie shared a bit about his Aunt Jocasta. To me it was reminiscent of the Wedding Night scene when Jamie the Storyteller told Claire stories about his family. He had his storyteller voice on and it just made me laugh. I sighed when Jamie presented Claire with the medical chest! It was better than I even imagined! And then when he said,

“24 years ago I married ye, Sassenach, I hope I haven’t ever given you cause to regret it.”

Sigh….he had that little twinkle in his eye. Was he getting teary eyed? I don’t know, but it was sweet and special.

And then it happened that night, the invasion. Bonnet that slippery snake! He had heard everything they had planned and knew what possessions they had on them. Just when the American Dream was beginning for them, it turned into a nightmare! At first, the piano caught me off guard. At first I felt like I was on a Louisiana River boat or something. I hadn’t remembered a piano being on board nor thought it could fit! And then it hit or rather they hit! Bonnet and his thieving men! I felt so violated for them. Honestly, I think the music fit. I know, I know, such controversy but honestly would you wanted to totally hear all the punches and sounds of Jamie getting the crap kicked out of him or Claire’s gasps and cries? Not me! Could they have picked another song? Sure! Are we the producers and writers? Nope! We don’t have a say. Sorry!

And the ring! Frank’s ring was left! I heard (SPOILER ALERT) that it will logistically be easier for Brianna to identify Jamie’s ring down the road and try to recover it. Her mom wore that ring her life when she was growing up so she knows what it looks like. It’s distinct. Either that or Jamie could possibly get Claire a ring that looks more so like the book version of the ring. Food for thought….

What a cliff hanger though! I can’t wait to see how things get all sorted out.

I’m so glad to have the show back on the air. It feels like I’m reunited with old friends! It feel so good. Warm and cozy too going into the Fall, Winter and Holiday time! And can I just say, Hot dang the Laird Jacket is back!

Well there you have it, my recap of Season 4 Episode 1, until next time!

Tara Heller is the mother of two boys, who lives in South Central Pennsylvania. However her heart is the South. Although she is fairly new to Outlander, she has truly immersed herself in it. She also loves history, especially the 18th century, genealogy, visiting the coast, spending time with family and blogging atwww.ladyoutnumbered321.com.  You can read about her MPC story here.
Giveaways Pre-Revolutionary War Period The Fiery Cross

Winners – #SaveAlamance Giveaway

May 13, 2018

We have two winners for the #SaveAlamance Giveaway.  They are Stephanie Bryant and Sherry Allen.  Stephanie & Sherry will each receive a copy of the book “Farming Dissenters” by Dr. Carole Watterson Troxler.  Congratulations to them both!

Thanks to all of you who participated in the contest.  Please remember that you can continue to donate to this worthwhile cause to save the epicenter of the battle as well as the triage area where the wounded were tended from outside development.  If every Outlander fan donated $1.00, the Battleground could reach their goal with ease. Please consider donating through their Go Fund Me page by clicking here.  And since sharing is such a nice thing to do, please share this post or the Go Fund Me page with others. Do it for Roger! More importantly, do it for history! And as always, thank you for reading Outlander North Carolina!

Pre-Revolutionary War Period The Fiery Cross

Save Alamance & A Giveaway!

May 4, 2018

 

New Bern, 20 October

Colonel James Fraser

Whereas the Peace and good Order of this Government has been lately violated and much Injury done to the Persons and Properties of many Inhabitants of this Province by a Body of People who Stile themselves Regulators, I do by the Advice of his Majesty’s Council Order and direct you forthwith to call a General Muster of so many Men as you Judge suitable to serve in a Regiment of Militia, and make Report to me as soon as possible of the Number of Volunteers that are willing to turn out in the Service of their King and Country, when called upon, and also what Number of effective Men belong to your Regiment who can be ordered out in case of an Emergency, and in case any further Violence should be attempted to be committed by the Insurgents. Your Diligent and punctual Obedience to these Orders will be well received by

Your Obed’t. Servant,

William Tryon
(Diana Gabaldon/The Fiery Cross)

That call to action from Governor Tryon to Jamie would come to a stunning conclusion in The Fiery Cross with the The Battle of Alamance, changing the lives of our beloved Outlander characters forever. But did you know that this battle is not fiction?

In 1771, an armed rebellion of over 2,000 backcountry farmers called Regulators battled with royal governor William Tryon’s 1,000-man militia. The spark for this conflict was growing resentment in the Carolina colony against the taxes, dishonest sheriffs, and illegal fees imposed by the British Crown. In response, the Regulators were formed and began to fight back. Though the rebellion was crushed, a few years later their tactics became a model for the colonists fighting the British in the American Revolutionary War.

The battle began on May 16 after the Regulators rejected Tryon’s suggestion that they disperse peacefully. Lacking leadership, organization, and adequate arms and ammunition, the Regulators were no match for Tryon’s militia. Many Regulators fled, leaving their bolder comrades to fight on.

The rebellion of the Regulators was crushed. Nine members of the king’s militia were killed and 61 wounded. The Regulator losses were much greater, though exact numbers are unknown. Tryon took 15 prisoners; seven were hung later. If you’ve read The Fiery Cross, you know that these hangings become quite personal for one major character.

After the battle, many Regulators moved on to other frontier areas beyond North Carolina. Those who stayed were offered pardons by the governor in exchange for pledging an oath of allegiance to the royal government.

The War of the Regulation illustrates how dissatisfied much of the population was during the days before the American Revolution. The boldness displayed by reformers opposed to royal authority provided a lesson in the use of armed resistance, which patriots employed a few short years later in the American War for Independence.

YOUR CALL TO ACTION

Alamance Battleground located in Alamance County, North Carolina, preserves the legacy of the May 16, 1771 Battle of Alamance. The state of North Carolina has already preserved 60-acres of battleground lands as a State Historic Site, open to the public for education; however, two tracts of land adjacent to the site are now up for sale. These lands include the actual epicenter of the battle in addition to lands utilized by Regulators during the leadup to the battle, and their retreat and triage afterward.

Please help in safeguarding a culturally and historically valuable battlefield from encroaching development! The Battleground is seeking funds to preserve this land in order to promote educational opportunities for generations to come, and to honor the legacy of those who made early sacrifices that ultimately paved the path towards American Independence.

If every Outlander fan donated just one dollar towards this worthwhile cause, the Battleground would have no trouble purchasing these two vitally important tracts of land and preserving the history of the Battle for generations to come! Please consider donating today at their Go Fund Me Page:  Save Alamance.  Also, would you consider sharing this post with others?  The more people we can make aware of this fundraiser, the better the chances are that we can #SaveAlamance!  Do it for Roger but more importantly, do it for history!

#SAVEALAMANCE GIVEAWAY

In honor of the Battle of Alamance and the Alamance Battleground, I am pleased to give away TWO (2)  copies of “Farming Dissenters: The Regulator Movement in Piedmont North Carolina” by Dr. Carole Watterson Troxler.

#SAVEALAMANCE GIVEAWAY RULES

NO PURCHASE NECESSARY AND A PURCHASE DOES NOT INCREASE YOUR CHANCES OF WINNING. Please enter below for a chance to win a copy of “Dissenting Farmers: The Regulator Movement in Piedmont North Carolina” by Dr. Carole Watterson Troxler. One entry per option completed.  This giveaway begins on Friday, May 4, 2018, at 1:00 PM Eastern Time and ends at 12:59 PM Eastern Time on Friday, May 11, 2018. The winners will be announced on the blog and in the Outlander North Carolina Facebook group. You must be 18 years of age or older to enter and must be a resident of the United States. (Apologies to our international readers. Giveaway laws vary widely in different countries and giveaways are totally prohibited in some.) Selection of the winners will be made by random drawing from qualifying entries within 48 hours of the end of the giveaway. Prizes will be mailed directly to the winners by Outlander North Carolina. Questions regarding the giveaway can be directed to outlandernorthcarolina@gmail.com.

Good luck and, as always, thank you for reading Outlander North Carolina!  P.S.  Don’t forget to donate to #SaveAlamance by clicking here.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Drums Of Autumn Outlander North Carolina Pre-Revolutionary War Period

Yo Ho Ho! Plus A Giveaway!

August 28, 2017

Fifteen men on the dead man’s chest. Yo ho ho and….wait a minute. No, no, no! Not a bottle of rum…..a giveaway!

In honor of Susan Jackson’s guest post this past week regarding the Gentleman Pirate Stede Bonnet, I will be giving away to one lucky reader, Miller Pope’s book “Pirates of the Carolinas”.  All that is required for you to enter is to answer one multiple choice question regarding your interests as it relates to Outlander North Carolina. This will help us know where we should focus most of our energies with our blog posts. Nothing else is required of you to enter although it would be nice if you subscribed to the blog, in the event you haven’t already. Sharing is always good so perhaps you might also consider sharing my blog and and the Facebook group with other like-minded people. (You know, the crazy, delusionally obsessed Outlander fan type – wink, wink?)

One more note of interest on Stephen Bonnet, that pirate we meet in Drums of Autumn and the one we all hate – if you have read the books, that is. Karen Henry over at Outlandish Observations told me that Diana (you know, Herself?) has said that Stephen is probably the son or grandson of Major Stede Bonnet. If anyone would know, it would be Diana, so, there you go! The apple doesn’t fall far from the tree.  He’s a chip off the old block.  Like father, like son.  OK, I’m rambling and I’ll stop now but you get the picture.  Diana is truly a walking history book.  I wish I could have her brain but I doubt she wants to part with it and I doubt even more that she would want mine in place of hers.

Now, back to the contest.  You must have or register for an Amazon account to enter; however, NO PURCHASE IS REQUIRED. One entry per person. Giveaway ends Sunday, September 3, 2017 at 11:59 PM. One winner from all entrants will be randomly selected by Amazon who will notify that person via email. Watch your inbox since the winner will have 48 hours to respond. For more, please see the Official Rules at https://amzn.to/GArules.

Ready to enter the Yo Ho Ho Giveaway? Well, then, just click on this link: Yo Ho Ho Giveaway.

Thanks for reading the blog and may the best Sassenach win!!!