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Fact or Fiction? Jamie Fraser & North Carolina Land Grants

August 16, 2019

Guest post from Traci Thompson

“It has long been the policy both of the Crown and of myself, Mr. Fraser, to encourage the settlement of land in the Colony of North Carolina by intelligent, industrious, and godly families, to the furtherance of the prosperity and security of all.” He lifted his cigar, took a deep lungful and exhaled slowly, pausing to cough. “To this end, sir, there is established a system of land grants whereby a large acreage may be given to a gentleman of means, who will undertake to persuade a number of emigrants to come and settle upon a part of it under his sponsorship. This policy has been blessed with success over the last thirty years; a good many Highlanders and families from the Isles of Scotland have been induced to come and take up residence here. Why, when I arrived, I was astonished to find the banks of the Cape Fear River quite thick with MacNeills, Buchanans, Grahams, and Campbells!”

The Governor tasted his cigar again, but this time the barest nip; he was anxious to make his point.


“Yet there remains a great deal of desirable land to be settled, further inland towards the mountains. It is somewhat remote, and yet, as you say, for men accustomed to the far reaches of the Scottish Highlands – “


“I did hear mentions of such grants, sir,” Jamie interrupted. “Yet is not the wording that persons holding such grants shall be white males, Protestant, and above thirty years of age? And this statement holds the force of law?”


“That is the official wording of the Act, yes.” Mr. Tryon turned so that I saw him now in profile, tapping the ash from his cigar into a small porcelain bowl. The corner of his mouth was turned up in anticipation; the face of a fisherman who feels the first twitch on his line.


“The offer is one of considerable interest,” Jamie said formally. “I must point out, however, that I am not a Protestant, nor are most of my kinsmen.”


The Governor pursed his lips in deprecation, lifting one brow.


“You are neither a Jew nor a Negro. I may speak as one gentleman to another, may I not? In all frankness, Mr. Fraser, there is the law, and then there is what is done.” He raised his glass with a small smile, setting the hook. “And I am convinced that you understand that as well as I do.”


“Possibly better,” Jamie murmured, with a polite smile.

~Drums of Autumn, Chapter 7, “Great Prospects Fraught With Peril.” (Circa 1767)

These paragraphs from Drums of Autumn introduced a long-running source of conflict for the story by giving Governor Tryon a certain leverage over Jamie – if Jamie doesn’t toe the line with Tryon, will Tryon play the religion card, “expose” Jamie as a Catholic, and take his land away from him?

But how much weight does this threat really carry…and are the details historical fact, or historical fiction?

First, as a land grant is central to the story, let’s take a brief look at what a North Carolina land grant was. Although “land grant” is the term often used, the technical term was “land patent.” Land patents transferred vacant land from a granting authority to a private person. North Carolina patents did not convey “free” land; grants were for some kind of service to the colony, or for a required payment of fees. There were two land grant systems in North Carolina: one was headright patents, in which land was granted for the service of bringing settlers into the colony, with a certain number of acres granted per transported person. This system ended by 1754, before Jamie and Claire’s time in NC. The second was purchase patent, land in exchange for fees paid at every step in the process. By the mid-1750’s, this was the only kind of patent granted in North Carolina, and thus the kind of grant Jamie would have received if he were really here in the 1760s.(1)



There were in fact a few, but not many, of enterprises such as Tryon describes: “…a large acreage may be given to a gentleman of means, who will undertake to persuade a number of emigrants to come and settle upon a part of it under his sponsorship.
” These were a type of headright patent, as the stipulation was bringing in emigrants to populate the colony. Harry Merrens states in Colonial North Carolina in the Eighteenth Century, “Grants were generally small…A few persons did manage to obtain large quantities of land either for speculative purposes or for building up large estates. Extensive holdings of land were so rare that neither practice was common…”(2)

The most notable person who engaged in this rare land speculation in NC was Henry McCulloh, a London merchant and colonial official whose family roots were in Scotland. He received two grants in his own name of 60,000 and 72,000 acres, and a third under the names of two of his trustees for 1.2 million acres. The condition of these grants was that quitrents on the lands be paid, and that settlers be installed on the land (3):

“At a Council held at Wilmington [NC] the 24th day September 1741… His Excellency having informed the Board That it was His Majesty’s Pleasure signified in some of his Majesty’s Instructions to Mr. McCulloh, that for the future all persons taking up lands should be obliged to seat the same according to their rights, i.e. with the person in whose right the land shall be taken up; But that such as have already obtained Warrants, shall only be obliged within three years from the date of their respective Grants to put a white man on every Tract 1,000 acres or under And two on a tract of 2,000 or above a thousand…And that the Secretary draw up a proclamation to give publick notice thereof…His Excellency…took notice of the absolute necessity of encouraging white persons to settle in this Province particularly the back parts of the same…” (4)

Pamphlet by Henry McCulloh, which he wrote after returning to England, hoping to impress the King, and get another appointment to the Colonies. (from NCPedia)

Merrens calls McCulloh “the unrivaled leading speculator in North Carolina” and reports that he was “’hawking it [the land] about in small quantities thro’ all the back parts of the Province and quite thro’ America even to Boston’”(5) as well as transporting Ulster Scots and Swiss emigrants into the colony.

But what of the “Protestant” requirement? McCulloh’s petitions for his grants in the 1730s do include wording such as “…Praying for a Grant of Twelve hundred Thousand Acres of Land in North Carolina in Consideration of Settling 6000 Protestants…” (6) and “…praying for a Grant of Lands upon the heads of the Pedee Cape Fear and Neus Rivers in North Carolina, and proposing to make a Settlement thereon of six thousand Swiss Palatines and other Foreign Protestants within the space of Ten years from the Date of {the} Grant…” (7) Other earlier petitions have the same wording, such as a 1679 petition to the British Privy Council to transport “about 80 Protestant families to Carolina aboard the frigate Richmond” and a request from Normandy seeking “sanction and assistance in projected planting of about fourscore Foreign Protestant families, being skilled in the Manufactures of Silks, Oyles, Wines, etc. who are willing to settle in Carolina.” (8) What is the reason for this? The religious situation in Europe was one of many reasons for emigration during this period, especially the desire to seek freedom of worship. Speculators such as Henry McCulloh were aware of the need to transport Protestants – particularly Scots-Irish, Swiss, and Germans – to the colonies. And as the Crown needed settlers and revenue, this was a win-win situation for all involved. (9) Another consideration for the Crown may have been loyalty, as Protestants were less likely to have divided allegiances. The greater number of Protestant settlers in North Carolina led to the statement made by the real Governor Tryon in 1765 that “every sect of religion abounds here except Roman Catholicism.” (10)

What is important to realize is that these references to settlement of Protestants in North Carolina did not refer to land law. In fact, North Carolina, especially as compared to the other colonies, was liberal in regards to religion. While there certainly was anti-Catholic sentiment, the only specific discrimination against them in legal policy regarded holding public office, and instructions given to the Royal Governor in the 1730s to permit “a liberty of conscience to all persons (except papists).” (11) It is likely that such instructions fell under Governor Tryon’s assertion that “there is the law, and then there is what is done,” as many such instructions relating to the Church of England were never able to be enforced in North Carolina. In 1679, the instructions of the Lords Proprietors to the Governor of Albemarle County, NC stated, “You are to take notice that wee doe grant unto all free persons that doe come to plant in Carolina before the 25th day of December, 1684…sixty akers of land…” and makes no mention of religion. (12) And not all of the land speculators’ petitions included the “Protestant” wording – McCulloh’s proposal of 1735/6 mentions sending over workmen and “such people as I intend to send there from Europe” to North Carolina and does not mention religion. (13)

A far more important consideration to the Crown regarding land patents was, as with most enterprises, money. Much of the energy and focus of the government documents relating to land grants of the period revolve around revenue generated or, most notably, the lack thereof. Even money took a back seat at times to the pressing need to simply have people in the colonies; in 1715, by decree from London, even impoverished families that could not pay rent were not to be deprived of their land, and those that had been were to have their property restored. (14) Also, land grants were a clear title in fee simple; the owner could sell or devise land absolutely at his pleasure and without consultation with government officials. (15)

These questions having been discussed, what of the age requirement? The 1679 document mentioned earlier made the specific provision for “sixty akers of land” to any free person who was “above the age of sixteen yeares.” (16) North Carolina, being an English colony, followed English common law; under English law one could buy or be granted land at any age but could not sell it in his own name until he arrived at the age of 21. (17)

As this overview shows, populating the colony and generating revenue were important considerations to North Carolina officials of the colonial period. To purposely attempt to divest a settler of his land would run contrary to the goal and would in fact be illegal; to do this for religious reasons in a tolerant colony would be difficult if not impossible, and there was no legal age restriction on land ownership. Happily, were Jamie actually here in the 1760s, he would not have had these issues to worry about.

The case: Are the details historical fact, or historical fiction?
Verdict: FICTION.

There you have it–straight from a North Carolina genealogist’s pen! Thanks, Traci, for this insight about land grants and the many different cultures that emigrated and settled here to make up this great state!
Traci Thompson is a married mother of two who lives in eastern North Carolina, and is, of course, an avid Outlander fan.  Traci is a Certified Genealogist and Local History & Genealogy Librarian. She is a contributing author for Outlander North Carolina.

Still shots of Jamie/Gov. Tryon are from https://outlander-online.com

Reference notes:
1 Margaret M. Hofmann, “Land Grants,” in Helen F.M. Leary, editor, North Carolina Research: Genealogy and Local History, 2nd edition (Raleigh, NC: North Carolina Genealogical Society, 1996), chapter 31.
2 Harry Roy Merrens, Colonial North Carolina in the Eighteenth Century: A Study in Historical Geography (Chapel Hill, NC: UNC Press, 1964), p. 25-26.
3 Mattie Russell, “McCulloh, Henry,” NCPedia (https://www.ncpedia.org/biography/mcculloh-henry : accessed 2019), citing William S. Powell, ed., The Dictionary of North Carolina Biography (Chapel Hill, NC: UNC Press, 1991.)
4 “Minutes of the North Carolina Governor’s Council, September 21, 1741 – September 29, 1741,” “Colonial and State Records of North Carolina,” Documenting the American South, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (https://docsouth.unc.edu/csr/index.php/document/csr04-0177 : accessed 2019); citing volume 4, p. 597-603
5 Merrens, Colonial North Carolina in the Eighteenth Century: A Study in Historical Geography, p. 26.
6 “Declaration by Murray Crymble and James Huey concerning their actions as agents for Henry McCulloh,” in “Colonial and State Records of North Carolina,” Documenting the American South, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (https://docsouth.unc.edu/csr/index.php/document/csr05-0289 : accessed 2019); citing volume 5, p. 769.
7 “Order of the Privy Council of Great Britain concerning Henry McCulloh’s land grants in North Carolina,” Great Britain, Privy Council, May 19, 1737, in “Colonial and State Records of North Carolina,” Documenting the American South, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (https://docsouth.unc.edu/csr/index.php/document/csr05-0289 : accessed 2019); citing volume 4, p. 253-254.
8 Finding aid to the British Records: Privy Council, citing Office Register, 21 April 1679-29 May 1680, Public Record Office, London, England, P.C. 2/68, North Carolina State Archives, Raleigh; digital images (https://files.nc.gov/dncrarchives/documents/files/ffa_br_privycouncil.pdf : accessed 2019).
9 Stewart E. Dunaway, Henry McCulloh & Son Henry Eustace McCulloh: 18th Century Entrepreneurs, Land Speculators of North Carolina (Lulu.com: Dunaway, 2014), p. 16.
10 Anne Russell & Marjorie Megivern, North Carolina Portraits of Faith: A Pictorial History of Religions (Norfolk, VA: The Donning Company, 1986), p. 136.
11 “Instructions to George Burrington concerning the government of North Carolina George II, King of Great Britain, 1683-1760; Great Britain. Board of Trade,” in “Colonial and State Records of North Carolina,” Documenting American South, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (https://docsouth.unc.edu/csr/index.php/document/csr03-0060 : accessed 2019); citing volume 3, p. 90-118.
12 “Instructions to the Governor of Albemarle County Carolina. Lords Proprietors. February 05, 1679,” in “Colonial and State Records of North Carolina,” Documenting the American South , University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (https://docsouth.unc.edu/csr/index.php/document/csr01-0098: accessed 2019); citing volume 1, p. 235-239.
13 “Proposal by Henry McCulloh concerning his efforts to settle people in North Carolina,” in “Colonial and State Records of North Carolina,” Documenting the American South , University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (https://docsouth.unc.edu/csr/index.php/document/csr05-0289 : accessed 2019); citing volume 4, p. 156.
14 David Southern and Louis P. Towles, “Land Grants and the Recruitment of Settlers to the Carolina Colony,” NCPedia (https://www.ncpedia.org/land-grants-part-3-land-grants-and : accessed 2019), citing William S. Powell, ed., Encyclopedia of North Carolina (Chapel Hill, NC: UNC Press, 2006.)
15 George Stevenson, “Foreword” (Raleigh, NC, June 1982) to Margaret M. Hofmann, Colony of North Carolina, 1735-1764, Abstracts of Land Patents Volume One (Weldon, NC: Roanoke News Company, 1982).
16 “Instructions to the Governor of Albemarle County. Carolina. Lords Proprietors. February 05, 1679,” in “Colonial and State Records of North Carolina,” Documenting the American South, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (https://docsouth.unc.edu/csr/index.php/document/csr01-0098 : accessed 2019); citing volume 1, p. 235-239.
17 Lee Albright & Helen F.M. Leary, “Strategy for Land Records,” p. 43, in Helen F.M. Leary, editor, North Carolina Research: Genealogy and Local History, 2nd edition (Raleigh, NC: North Carolina Genealogical Society, 1996), chapter 2, “Designing Research Strategies.”

Drums Of Autumn Fraser's Ridge Outlander North Carolina Season 4 The Homecoming Uncategorized

Fauna at Leatherwood Mountains & WWCD?

July 24, 2019

from Mary Helen Ellis

If you are reading this, you are one of “those” that are sucked into the world of Outlander, and glad of it! The Outlander Vortex–I find I measure a good portion of my everyday life by WWCD, What Would Claire Do? It’s twenty degrees outside my mountain cabin, snow is a foot deep, and I must walk out to the car and clear off the windshield. WWCD–it just makes my “git up and go” a little easier! For Pete’s sake, if I must run out to the mailbox when it is 95 degrees, I stop and think, at least I don’t have to chop wood to cook dinner.

Our lives are a cakewalk compared to the 18th century. Every once in awhile, though, there is a reminder of Fraser’s Ridge time that sneaks up on you. These peeks into their world are very close by in Leatherwood Mountains. The flora and fauna of the North Carolina wilderness assault your senses as soon as you arrive. Owning a cabin in Leatherwood, I will share some of the fauna that I have encountered over the last twenty years. I am from eastern North Carolina, my town literally has 5 streets and 1 blinking light, so I am a rural gal, but it is quite different than being a mountain wilderness lassie…WWCD!

Fauna always makes me think of fairies. My 25-year-old niece has a favorite Leatherwood fairy story: at the bottom of Flag Branch Road is a mountain creek and waterfall. Years ago, when she was 6, Mara saw a fairy at the waterfall. About 6” across with white wings, it fluttered by her and spoke to her–I’m guessing a luna moth, lovely in its own right, but more so as a mountain stream fairy. A not so pleasant recent story involves my blind Yorkie, her daily constitutions, and the redbugs (chiggers) she brought back to my lap! I can’t watch Jamie and Claire rolling around the beautiful green grass without thinking of chiggers and their itchy bites that last for days! WWCD in the NC mountains?

Yep, red bugs, millipedes, ladybugs, oh my! Our ladybugs are of the Asian variety, said to have been sprayed from aircraft by the Wildlife Commission on the mountain ridges to rid the mountains of some other kind of tree damaging insect. These are not the cute red and black variety they named a vehicle after; these orange ladybugs swarm into log cabins and have an odor. Claire would have never seen these. But she probably had plenty of millipedes, cluster flies, and other insects to contend with. I see some different species every time I stay at Leatherwood. I believe there are many more varieties of insects in the mountains than back east.

Leatherwood Mountains is a wildlife sanctuary, no hunting, no ATV’s, no fireworks; just peace and the natural quiet only found in nature. Large game animals such as deer and turkey live happily in the natural environment of the gated 5000-acre resort. Populous game animals also attract the “top of the food chain” critters. I have had a cabin for 20 years and have yet to actually see a bear, a wolf, a panther, but have seen a bobcat. There is clear evidence of scat and tracks to show that they are living with us in the wilderness. The first renters of our cabin in 1999 woke to find a bear on top of their minivan, hoping for the left-over french fries inside. On a January trip to Leatherwood, we arrived at midnight. The next morning, we found wolf tracks by the horse trough. We have seen tracks of coyotes, wolves, panthers, bears, and elk tracks as large as a man’s boot! My husband swears he and his parents saw an actual elk, (not out of the realm of possibility as they have been reintroduced in the southern NC mountains). Remember, I have yet to see any of these animals, only their tracks. I have seen skunks, raccoons, groundhogs, eagles, hawks, owls, turkeys, and more.

WWCD? In the movie “The Songcatcher” the old mountain woman told the Yankee lady…if you hear a “painter’s*” cry (sounds just like a woman’s cry) and he is after you, run as fast as you can while stripping off your clothes. The panther will attack your clothes and shred them giving you precious time to flee. *The Eastern Cougar, panther, or “painter,” as they are called by mountain folk, is said to be extinct in this part of the US by biologists. Many people claim to have seen and heard their bone-chilling cries, especially in the vast swampy places in the coastal areas of North Carolina. Do they or don’t they? Depends on who you ask.

Copperhead with a nearby mothball, said to keep snakes away. The bite of a copperhead usually happens when they are stepped on. It’s easy to see how well their colors and pattern
camouflage them on the ground.

Who remembers the three storylines regarding snakes in Outlander? In 20 years, I have seen snakes three times (four, if you count the dead one on the road). The first time there were two in a pallet of rock with a wire fence around it. I wanted to use the left-over rock to edge a flower bed. It was me or the snakes. Had I known what kind at the time, I may have let them be. I tied a rope around the pallet, attached it to my trailer hitch and yanked the fence and rocks to smithereens. The snakes turned out to be king snakes–the good guys. The second snake encounter was also a good guy. However at 6’-7’, I did not bother the black snake as it scaled a steep embankment! I hope he is still around, guarding against snake number three, a beautifully marked but poisonous copperhead. WWCD with a very large Copper Head?

We sort of chased him off with mothballs and have not seen him for a year. I have learned though, that this fauna is one to watch for; know what is beneath your feet! Thankfully, we don’t have outhouses to contend with (except for one of our cabins, Hemlock Point, that has an outhouse ½ bath in the basement!).

Today’s cabins with AC, WiFi, Netflix, refrigerators, dishwashers, laundry appliances, computers, central heat, etc. are modern and comfortable, just like your home. But, step out the door and you can enter Jamie and Claire’s time. Leatherwood’s motto is “The stars are our streetlights.” It is true in every sense of the word; I encourage rental guests to arrive in daylight hours. At night, however, you can see more stars than you knew existed, because of very little light pollution. On a moonless night, at the right time of year, you can make out the Milky Way! We saw Claire make the startling realization when she first rode behind Jamie and saw the town of Inverness off in the distance, and no incandescent lights anywhere. It is like this at Leatherwood when you look out over the mountains. You are in the Outlander moment.

So, I believe what Claire would do is relish and stand in awe of the fauna she encountered in her life at Fraser’s Ridge in the 18th-century mountains of North Carolina. She had no choice but to fall in love with the area, but we do. We can turn off the television, shut off our phones and computers, and step out the door at Leatherwood Mountains….aka Fraser’s Ridge!

Thank you, Mary Helen, for the preview of what animals we may encounter while we’re at Leatherwood Mountains in October at A Fraser’s Ridge Homecoming!
Why not plan a visit to the NC mountains, and consider the Leatherwood Resort for a cabin rental? Their lovely homes range from one bedroom to five, so you can go alone for a breather, or meet the whole family for a wonderful vacation! The resort also features camping sites if that’s more your speed! Amenities include a swimming pool, horses available for trail riding, tennis, fishing, hiking, and tubing down the creek! Take some time to just be, enjoy the natural surroundings and all of the flora and fauna, and experience the back county much like it was in the 18th century! Your stress hormones will thank you!

Diana Gabaldon Drums Of Autumn NC Historic Sites New Bern Outlander North Carolina Pre-Revolutionary War Period Season 4 Tryon Palace

On the Trail of History: A Journey through Diana Gabaldon’s North Carolina, Part I

May 9, 2019

Guest post from Lisa A. Margulies

I recently had the opportunity to visit several sites in North Carolina, tracing the steps of the 18th Century historical figures, James Alexander Malcolm Mackenzie Fraser and his wife, Claire Elizabeth Beauchamp Randall Fraser. What? They are NOT real historical figures? Don’t tell that to the fans of Diana Gabaldon’s writing. To us, they are as real as the locations the North Carolina Department of Natural and Cultural Resources brought the author to this last weekend in April.

My journey began in Iowa with a flight from Des Moines to Raleigh, NC. I drove to the historical town of New Bern on the eastern coastal region to kick off my tour. Tryon Palace would be the first to host Diana’s visit so I decided to familiarize myself with the Palace and the community in which it is centered.

The Palace as described in the Diana’s Outlander series is indeed like the grand opulence on display today. The first NC Governor’s state of residence was completed in 1770 and occupied by Governor Tryon until 1771 when a new Governor, Josiah Martin replaced him. Tryon went to great lengths to document the construction and furnishings of his mansion. This proved invaluable for the 1959 reconstruction of the Palace. All but the original stables were destroyed by fire just 28 years after its completion in 1798. The Governor had hired an English architect to create a place of residence worthy of King George III and Queen Charlotte of England, one that could support visits of royalty and promote the affairs and the Crown’s dominion. It is easy to imagine the pages of The Fiery Cross come to life and to understand the the Regulator’s points of view regarding unfair use of tax payer’s dollars! The Palace is definitely fit for a King! No wonder Governor Tryon “got out of Dodge” (or accepted the commission of Governor of the State of New York taking his furnishings with him in late 1771) before the backlash of his spending could ignite a Revolutionary War. Wait, in a way, it did. The grievances aired by North Carolinians to their government became seeds of revolutionary discontent. Thus, history as we know it.

The beauty of the Tryon Palace was used as a backdrop for Diana Gabaldon and the two events for which she was the guest of honor. The first, “An Evening with Diana Gabaldon,” began with a small group and cocktails at a private historical residence in New Bern and then moved to the North Carolina Historical Museum adjacent to the Palace for a lavishly Outlander themed dinner with seventy plus in attendance. The event had been planned for the South Lawn of the Palace Gardens but due to inclement weather was moved indoors.

Diana was escorted in by her husband, Doug Watkins, with accompaniment from a local bagpiper playing the Skye Boat Song . The attendees were seated, (well, actually standing at that point), around ten tables, pumped to hear all that she had to share. Introductions were given by various members of the North Carolina State Government and Diana was given platform to speak for approximately 30 minutes before taking questions from her followers. Our character-themed dinner and dessert followed the conclusion of the Q&A session.

So what did Diana share? She began by addressing her writing connection to North Carolina and the importance of the Regulator history in the story of Jamie and Claire, and now, Murtagh, in the TV series. This storyline, by the way, was her suggestion and she is pleased with the conflict it sets up going forward in the adaptation. While she does see the scripts and is allowed notes upon them, Diana does NOT have complete control of every detail. Sometimes her voice is heard, sometimes not. She joked that the NC of the show is NOT geographically accurate and that the powers that be are counting on viewers not having been to the actual state of North Carolina! She further added, that having seen the dailies from season 5, at least the wigs are a lot better! (Cheers from all!)

Back to the subject of writing and specifically why it takes so long for Diana to complete a book… The average novel is 100,000 words. Outlander, the shortest book in the series is 300,000 words. It takes at least 2 1/2 years to write a book with all the research that she puts into each novel. This led to Diana’s reasoning for not having an assistant. She could tell someone to go to the store and pick up hotdogs and beans but if she went to the store, she might see other interesting ingredients. Thus changing, adapting, creating a whole new menu at the end of the day. DG has many times described her writing style as nonlinear in fashion. Her example illustrates this as well. Needless to say, none of her adoring fans will be hired as a personal research assistant anytime soon. (Sigh.)

Diana also looks for first person historical accounts to weave in the details of her storytelling. She cited the Battle of King’s Mountain and the historical account of an actual soldier’s experience for this. The Battle will be included in the ninth book. Watch for details about tree bark flying from bullet spray and the aftermath of other sights, sounds, and smells experienced by a character in Bees. “History is not what happened, it’s what people wrote down about it.” Diana went on to share other consultant and script-writing anecdotes. She told the story of Jamie’s missing hat in an early season four episode. It was written that after the misplaced hat had been found in the pig’s pen the hat was to be thrown away in the trash can. Diana had to step in and explain the value of the leather and that nothing would be thrown away in that time period, especially in a wastebasket because that didn’t even exist! The scene was rewritten and the hat was then placed on an upper shelf. Script writers think dialogue first then what people are actually doing last!

Overall, DG’s experience with the series, writing and being on the set has been most enjoyable. Everyone is always joking around! Diana made us all want to stow away in her luggage next trip to the set.

Six questions were answered from the audience during the last part of the formal programming and before dinner. Diana was asked about how much input she has in the casting process and she told the story of finding the leads Sam Heughan and Caitriona Balfe. Diana has no say in the hiring and remembered thinking Sam was a chameleon actor, he looked different in every role he had played so far. Diana was shown “grotesque” pictures of him but the tape sent to her was “Jamie.” The standing joke was that Jamie would probably turn out to be the UPS man, but Sam was found quickly in the selection process! Finding Claire proved to be the difficult one. Down to the wire in time, everyone was sent home with the reject pile and told to find her. Caitriona was then unanimously selected from that pile based upon her own self tape with an episode 1 scene, “Help, he’s going over!”

Other questions were also answered:
Q: Has there been any talk about a spin off Lord John series?
A: Although lots of interest has been expressed by many sources, no official conversations have been had.

Q: How has Diana’s Catholic upbringing influenced the characters and her writing?
A: Diana has knowledge, for one, (unlike many of the show’s script writers). Also, Celtic Catholics/Christians have an interesting take on religion. They tend to incorporate incantations, charms, rituals into their beliefs and daily lives, lending to a more natural process. The issue of killing was discussed and the introduction of other characters such as Quakers help to give the story balance here.

Q: Does Diana know what her characters will be and do? How do her characters come to her?
A: The pace and process take shape from a kernel, scene by scene. Diana went on to describe this process of her writing from the kernel in her mind’s eye of a Scottish crystal goblet.

The final question of the evening revolved around the origin of her writing and 1st novel. Her practice novel had to be historical because if she couldn’t come up with original stories, at least she’d have something to fall back on. Many of us have heard this telling of the Doctor Who episode that sparked the flame for an 18th-century man in a kilt who would become our beloved Jamie. Her English character, Claire, wasn’t having any of that 18th-century vibe though, and Diana knew from her voice and that first cottage introduction that Claire would be a modern woman having gone back in time, thus creating the sci-fi aspect. This origin of Outlander is a pleasure to hear in Diana‘s voice anytime.

On a personal note, I was given the opportunity to mingle a few minutes at the end of the evening. After bit of fangirling, I recovered my senses enough to ask this final question: If she could remove Herself as author and just be a fan of The Fiery Cross, what three moments would she most like to transfer to the visual medium of season five? Diana responded with the scene that involves Claire in the windowsill in the middle of the night. Jamie comes in to find her with goosebumps on her arms. What transpires then is a very intimate moment that Diana is really pushing for inclusion this season. (Fingers crossed!) The next scene she described to me I will only say, for spoiler reasons, is a moment of great impact on Roger and his character. She would want to include that and also the poignant aftermath with his son.

Of course I was thrilled to have had this interaction with my all-time favorite author. So, along with my thanks for her insight and time that evening, I told Diana I would be following her as she traveled across the state over the next few days. (Now cemented in the mind of Diana Gabaldon is the image of me as a stalker. Great.)

This incredible “Evening with Diana Gabaldon” transpired over four plus hours and was made possible by the coordinated efforts of Bill McCrea, Executive Director of Tryon Palace, Susi Hamilton, NC Department of Natural and Cultural Resources Secretary and their amazing team members. Many thanks and much praise to everyone involved.

Thank you so much Lisa for sharing your “Evening with Diana Gabaldon” at Tryon Palace with us!

Tryon Palace is a great place to visit, as well as the adjoining NC History Center, with informative and interactive exhibits–it’s fun and educational! We appreciate the folks at the NC Department of Natural and Cultural Resources bringing this amazing event to eastern North Carolina in support of historic New Bern. All proceeds went towards continuing repairs at Tryon Palace from Hurricane Florence in September 2018.

Drums Of Autumn Native Americans Season 4

ONC Administrators’ Choice Awards – The Best & Worst of Outlander Episode 412, Providence

January 25, 2019

It’s time for the final Admin Choice Awards for Outlander Season 4. What? No awards for Episode 413? Nope. We’re skipping the awards for the finale besides I think we will all be too depressed to even think about it. Not to mention, I have a date with a certain mouse down in Florida so I’ll be taking a couple of weeks off to try to forget all my sorrows as we head into that unspeakable thing called Droughtlander. And speaking of that horrid word, how in the world did we get here? How can 13 weeks go by so quickly? How are we to endure the rest of 2019 and probably part of 2020 without our favorite show? Well, we here at Outlander North Carolina have some ideas and we will be trying to fill the gap for not only ourselves but for you as well with some things we think you’ll appreciate. Special projects and posts are on the way so don’t despair, my Outlander friends! We will muddle through together!

So without any further whining and complaining, I present to you the winners of this week’s ONC Admin Choice Awards for Episode 412, Providence. This week’s voting contributors are Susan Jackson, Mitzie Munroe, Nancy Roach and Harmony Tersanschi. The envelope please…

Susan:  This may sound morbid, but watching a man be tortured and die for his beliefs made my heart swell. The priest’s death didn’t speak to me as much in the books, for some reason.  

Nancy: My choice may surprise you, but I was happy to see a little bitter, sarcastic humor show up in the script as Roger referred to himself as an idiot for making poor choices because of his love for Bree. I loved that he referred to his place of captivity as “the idiot’s hut”. I think that should really have been the title of the episode.

Mitzie: Seeing Roger make the decision to abandon his escape and return back to the Mohawk village to help the priest die a quicker death, thus ending his suffering. The musical overlay to the most stunning sequence of visual events that transpired during that whole scene was just amazing. Bravo!

Harmony: This is going to be a tough one for me, because I truly loved the entire episode. If I had to choose though, I think I’d go with the scene with LJG & Bree discussing her wanting to speak to Bonnet. Everything about that scene was wonderful, the acting, chemistry between the two, the way LJG was there for her, and the icing on the cake was Jamie narrating his letter to Bree.

Susan:  Roger: “Ah, f*@#in’’ hell.” Everyone has said something similar when they realize they’re about to do something that doesn’t make good sense.

Nancy: Roger:  “That’s it lads. Take me back to the idiot’s hut.”

Mitzie: Bree telling LJG “You are impossible not to like”. That was just too, too sweet. And so, so true. #TeamLordJohnGrey

Harmony: Bree to LJG, “you are impossible not to like”. That was such a cute moment & Oh so true!

Susan: Richard Rankin was absolutely wonderful in this episode.

Nancy: Richard Rankin. This was his episode.

Mitzie: This years Golden Globe for Best Supporting Actor is…… This years Emmy for Best Supporting Actor is…… This years Screen Actors Guild for Best Supporting Actor is…… RICHARD RANKIN!!!!!! Seriously, he better be on one of these lists for that performance.

Harmony: I have to give it to the actress who played the Mohawk woman, the love interest of the priest & the mother to his child. She was absolutely phenomenal throughout every scene she was in!

Susan:  The grief of the Mohawk man-I didn’t realize his feelings were so invested in Johiehon until I saw his face as she climbed onto the pyre.

Nancy: The Mohawk woman stepping into the fire. This was not in the book.

Mitzie: Seeing the mohawk woman (Johiehon) step onto the pyre to die with her love. That was so heartbreaking to witness. And to see Kaheroton’s grief upon witnessing her decision and he’s left holding the only thing left of her, her child, that just had me bawling.

Harmony: Was watching the Mohawk woman walk into the flames with the priest. Such an emotional moment.

Susan:  The realization that every major scene came about because someone was doing something that seemed unreasonable because of their own personal convictions.

Nancy: Roger’s performance. He was really outstanding.

Mitzie: All the conversations Roger had with the priest. Roger’s emotions were so gripping, I was completely sucked into his despair. And bless him, he tried his damndest to convince the priest his convictions were not worth dying over but alas the priest would not relent and Roger could not abandon him to save himself. Roger is such a good guy!

Harmony: All the moments with LJG and Bree together. Those two just completely shine when in a scene together!

Susan:  Knowing that Lord John had knowledge of the jailbreak and he let it go. He could get into as much trouble as everyone else.

Nancy: The portrayal of the priest and Mohawk woman’s demise was a little over the top for me.

Mitzie: Nothing really bugged me in this episode except the fact that no one noticed the keys on the floor. Really? No one noticed? I did find myself yelling at the screen “Ya’ll, get the keys”! But I guess it was needed to extend our beliefs that we will be seeing more of Bonnet in the future.

Harmony: I can honestly say that there wasn’t one thing that I disliked about this episode. Shocking, I know lol.

Susan:  This episode knocks 403 off the number one spot on my list.

Nancy: Will wait until next week to rate the episode.

Mitzie: 1st*409 / 2nd*405 / 3rd*412 / 4th*403 / 5th*404 / 6th*407 / 7th*408 / 8th*411 / 9th*410 / 10th*406 / 11th*401 / 12th*402

Harmony: This one took the cake for me. By a hair it slid into my #1 spot, followed closely by the episode of Sam & Bree’s meeting.


A BIG thanks to all the administrators who took the time out of their busy schedules to contribute their votes each week during this season and thank YOU for taking the time to read our Admin Choice Awards! We’ve had fun doing them and then comparing each other’s opinions once they got posted. But now, we want to hear from you? What did you think of Episode 412, Providence? What were your favorites? What didn’t you like?

P.S. I’ll be back in a couple of weeks after some emotional therapy with “the mouse”. In the meantime, keep a chin up and hang on tight, Sassenachs! We can do this!!!

Your Forever Outlander Friend and Fanatic,

Beth


Drums Of Autumn Season 4

ONC Administrators’ Choice Awards – The Best of Outlander Episode 410, The Deep Heart’s Core

January 12, 2019

After a much-needed holiday break, we’re baaaaaaack with the ONC Administrators’ Choice Awards! For this post, we are focusing on last week’s Episode 410, The Deep Heart’s Core.  This week’s voting contributors are Mitzie Munroe, Susan Jackson, Tara Heller, Cameron Hogg, Stephanie Bryant, Nancy Roach, and me, Beth Pittman! Without further ado, the envelope please….

Cameron: Bree’s confrontation of Jamie and Ian about Roger’s disappearance.  It shows that Bree is just as strong and fiery as both of her parents, and despite all that has happened to her, she does not see herself as a victim.

Susan:  The family “meeting” headed up by Bree, calling the menfolks out for almost killing Roger.  Excellent acting by every single cast member.

Stephanie:  Loved when Jamie and Bree are walking in the woods and he “shows” her how she physically couldn’t have fought Bonnet while she was being raped. They shared a common experience, having both been raped. Bree was able to conclude she couldn’t have done anything to stop him, and if she did, he would’ve killed her. These walks seem to strengthen the bond between father/daughter and highlight how much these two really have in common, besides blood.

Mitzie: Seeing for a brief moment a very happy Fraser clan sitting down together having dinner. It’s all smiles and laughter and you can see Jamie’s pride in having his family surrounding him.

Tara:   I just loved Claire and Bree going back and forth about what they missed from the future. I love seeing their mother/daughter exchanges. It’s neat to see they can both talk about their other life together.

Beth:  I know this sounds very simplistic but I loved the moment when all the Frasers are gathered around the dinner table. This is the family Jamie always wanted and the home Claire never had. It’s the one moment of family bliss before all you-know-what breaks loose.

Nancy: Jamie’s and Brianna’s discussion of their mutual rape experiences. It was a difficult conversation and strange bonding experience between a newly acquainted father and daughter.

Cameron:  Jamie telling Young Ian to get up off his knee when he proposes to Bree.  This episode was so emotional, it was a well needed laugh at the end.

Susan:  “Get off your knee, ye eejit.”  I cracked up at that one.

Stephanie:  After Young Ian says, “It would be my honor to take your hand in the holy sacrament of marriage” Favorite line is Jamie’s response “Get off yer knee, idjit” This exchange lightened the tense and awkward scene, allowing the viewer to smile. Jamie then stepped in to talk to Bree, saving her from responding to YI’s proposal.

Mitzie:  “I will find him Lass.I will not rest until I do. You have my word”. Brianna: “I’ll hold you to that vow”.

Tara: “She’s at peace here isn’t she? Aye in her wee garden.” That’s what I hope to have this year in mine. Peace. 🙂

Beth:  “Get off yer knees, ye idjit.”  The one moment of comic relief in a very serious episode.

Nancy: The White Sow would say when Claire and Bree were reminiscing about food they missed from the future, “Hamburgers, messy cheeseburgers, with all the fixings from Carnies” and “ Peanut butter and jelly sandwiches. With the White Sow it is always about food.

Cameron:  This episode really spotlighted Sophie Skelton.  I’ve not been a huge fan of her portrayal until the past couple episodes, but this episode really impressed me.

Susan:  I’ll have to give a group award for this one:  Sophie, Cait, Sam and John win for the blow-up scene.  Every emotion and action was perfectly portrayed.

Stephanie:  Best Actor: JAMMF! He has shown and continues to show all the emotions he is feeling without always verbalizing them. For me it’s more what his face and body language say then his words. That’s a true sign of a great actor!!

Mitzie:  This is hard; Richard, Sophie, Sam…. All did wonderful jobs in their character moments. But I am gonna give it to Sam this time. His facial expressions, delivery and screen presence was just spot on. Sophie is a super close second.

Tara:  Sophie. She’s really starting to own her character and we get to see different sides of her acting.

Beth:  Sam! I’m telling you he has been spot on this season with the portrayal of Jamie and I love ALL the emotions he displayed in this episode. And the moment with Bree when he “taught” her that she couldn’t have done anything to prevent what Bonnet did to her was one I had looked forward to from the book. Perfection!

Nancy: This was Bree’s episode. From her difficult conversation with Jamie about her rape, her PTSD dream about having sex with Roger who turns into Bonnet, to her fury when she learns Roger was sold to the Mohawk, Bree held her own in this episode.

Cameron:  I thought the ring switch (which one Bonnet stole from Claire on the ferry) really paid off here.  It made for a big reveal during the scene in which Jamie learns it was really Bonnet who attacked Bree.

Stephanie:  Roger at the stones was surprising. As a book reader, I was initially upset when his hand ALMOST touched the stones, then they cut away! What a relief!! That’s all I’ll say!

Susan:  The Mohawk man’s glance at Roger when he said something about how his carriage awaits–was that a knowing-of-the-future glance?  Or had the Mohawk just seen carriages and spoke enough English that he knew that Roger was being sarcastic?

Mitzie:  I always joke that the slap that Claire laid on Laoghaire in Season 1 was like “The Slap Heard Around the World” but Brianna’s towards Jamie and then her roundhouse punch towards Ian was quite deafening.

Tara:  It’s very slight, but Roger showing up next to Bree and then realizing it was a dream!

Beth: Not really surprising but I was a little thrown by the way the episode ended. How many times have we been left wondering whether someone is going back through the stones or not. Having read the book, I know what’s going to happen and what’s not so I guess unless they totally change the storyline, it’s to throw off non-book readers. I pray the writers don’t change the storyline.

Nancy:   I had two.

  1. Briana’s hitting both Jamie and Ian hard enough to cause Ian’s nose to bleed surprised me. That seemed out of character for a daughter raised by two traditional British parents in the 50’s.  I had to go back and reread this part of the book. Bree did hit Jamie, but I pictured it more as a slap.
  2. Roger’s ability to outrun the Cherokee when he almost collapsed the day before just trying to walk. Starved, dehydrated and exhausted, he still was suddenly able to run. (Also, shouldn’t his wrist be broken, dislocated or at least sprained after hanging by it?) How lucky he was able to keep those two tiny gemstones safe despite all he went through. I would have lost them in the first fight with Jamie.

Cameron:   I know it’s not like the book, and not maybe a popular opinion, but Murtaugh and Jocasta getting together would make me really happy.  Murtaugh deserves a happy ending, and the chemistry between Duncan Lacroix and Maria Doyle Kennedy in just the one scene they shared in this episode is great.  

Susan:  Again, I have to say I love watching the scenes of them “living”–the family meals, working around the homestead.

Stephanie:  Loved the family around the table scene, even though it wasn’t so harmonious this week. It’s a more accurate depiction, families sometimes disagree, argue and have heated words! Although it may have went too far when Bree started hitting people!

Mitzie:  The looks on Lizzie’s, Jamie’s and Ian’s faces when they realized they screwed up royally! You can cut the anguish in that room with a knife it was so thick.

Tara: Seeing more life on the ridge. Seeing Claire in her garden.

Beth: Just seeing them all settling into life on the Ridge. I love that they all feel at home now and that they belong to not only the place but to each other.

Nancy: I enjoyed seeing the Fraser’s working together and dining like a normal, happy family for a change. Of course it didn’t last long. I was also excited to see another White Sow cameo with her trough of beautifully arranged tossed salad.

Cameron:  Claire never takes much responsibility for the Roger/Bonnet mix up.  She could have stopped it all by telling Jamie who the attacker was. I know she promised Bree she wouldn’t, and that Jamie already feels responsible for helping Bonnet escape, but it still makes me mad that Claire stays so angry with Jamie, when she’s not innocent in all this.

Susan:  Too much of Roger wandering around.  I know we need to see how he’s suffered, as well as his prisoner companion, but I think they could’ve showed less of that and a little more of life on the Ridge.

Stephanie:  I was a little bored when they kept showing Roger being pulled by the Cherokees. I understand the writers wanted the audience to understand what he was experiencing but I got it rather quickly after the other poor captive fell and barely got up.  (After, he seemed to be a little too healthy conversing with Roger and tied to the tree). Several scenes kept panning to all the Cherokees on horseback, I didn’t need to keep seeing them to know what the situation was.

Mitzie:  Jamie’s actions towards Brianna in the woods to get her to admit that she couldn’t do anything to stop Bonnet from raping her. It was agonizing to read that part in the book. Seeing it wasn’t much better.

Tara:  Bree slapping Jamie and Ian. I mean, I get it she’s pissed and heartbroken but gees pick something up and throw it instead! Jamie can be pissed! Afterall, Bonnet did that night robbing them and killing their friend. Of course he has the right to show his anger like you Bree! Ok, I’m done.

Beth:  I didn’t like the look of disdain Claire gave Jamie after she put the ring on the table. She wasn’t exactly guiltless either. This is one of those instances where it was everbody’s fault and no one’s at all.  

Cameron:   Hard to say an exact ranking, but this is definitely in my top 5.

Susan:  Top five (because have mercy, the episode numbers are running together in my poor brain):  406 is still my favorite, followed by 404, 405, 409, 410.

Stephanie:  Episode 10 wasn’t my number one favorite in the series, the Bree meeting Jamie in Episode 7 can’t be topped in my opinion. But it was at least equal to the others so far. Drums of Autumn is my favorite book, besides Outlander, so I’m satisfied the writers have chosen to use Diana’s most important words and plot points.

Mitzie:   1st*409 / 2nd*405 / 3rd*403 / 4th*404 / 5th*407 / 6th*408 / 7th*410 / 8th*406 / 9th*401 / 10th*402

Tara:  This episode comes in second for me. The best one for me was The Birds and the Bees.

Beth:  This is probably my third favorite of the season behind The False Bride and The Birds and The Bees.

Nancy: I can’t remember where I am on episode ranking anymore. Lol! I think I’m going to wait until the last episode to rank them.

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So, now that we’ve voted, it’s your turn? Agree? Disagree? Tell us in the comments who or what gets your vote for “Best” Awards for Episode 410, The Deep Heart’s Core. Leave it in the comments!